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marie82
marie82 asks:
Q:

My 6 year old has been dry since 2 and a half, but has started wetting the bed again in the last year.

In Topics: Physical Health, Bedwetting
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Dr.Monika
Jan 8, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

If a child starts to wet the bed after being dry at night for at least 6 months, she should be evaluated by her regular health care provider.  He or she will rule out a chronic bladder infection by doing a urine test and should send your child for an ultrasound of the bladder and kidneys to make sure that they are structurally sound.

Please schedule an appointment with your daughter's health care provider asap.

Best regards.
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Additional Answers (3)

Mommy2One
Mommy2One writes:
Yes, you can have your family Physician check your child's urine to rule out a possible bladder infection, but 9 times out of 10 a family Physician will not check first for diabetes.  Inexpensive finger stick with results right away.  Signs are bedwetting which parents do not believe is one sign.  If your child has had a thirst problem along with bed wetting, and a fruity smell from his/her breathe take your child to "urgent care" and have a simple finger stick done.  Don't wait to schedule an appointment with your Primary Care Physician, as over time the child will develop Ketones in the urine.  I am an Advocate for my child with Type 1 Diabetes, and it has been 5 years now and what you you wrote brings back memories.  It might not be Diabetes, but have the finger stick along with a Ketone Test (Urine) test. The results are instant.  Do not wait any longer.  If it is not diabetes, then you can have the urine test done for the bladder and other testing to follow.  If you have any further questions, please feel free to contact me.
> 60 days ago

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tesncurt5402
tesncurt5402 , Parent writes:
Health issues such as diabetes and bladder problems can cause bed wetting. My family has learned that stress, anxiety, and nightmares can also cause issues with bed wetting. Sometimes medication can be used to control the bladder to reduce the wetting episodes. If the wetting is due to stress or anxiety, consider having the child seen by a counselor. This can also help in reducing the accidents. Letting your child know that it is ok and that they are not the only child to have these problems can help ease some of their anxiety towards the issue.
> 60 days ago

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ccrig
ccrig writes:
I had this problem until recently with my son who is 10 years old. He was potty trained at 16 months, but by the time he was 4-5 years old he started to wet almost every night. My son is a very smart and good boy. I discussed the issue with the pediatrician and tried all I could try, but nothing helped. I understand how frustrating is the answer " it will take time, but it will change..."  he used to wet the bed twice every night.
Recently I found an article in a Costco magazine. The author is a pediatrician and he stated that usually the children go to bathroom in a rush. They do not take time to release all the urine from the bladder. He suggested to discuss this with your child explaining that all the urine needs to be released before bed. They need to push, and try hard to make sure all is out. When he/she goes to bed, the bladder needs to be empty, so that there is room for the fluid to accumulate for the whole night.  It is amazing how a simple piece of information can change a child's and parent's life. At the beginning he went from having accidents twice a night to once in 4-5 days. This lasted for about 3 weeks, and during this period he did not use pool ups. Since then he never wet the bed again (1.5 months).
I am so happy, and of course he is even happier. I hope that our experience can help you.
> 60 days ago

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