Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
Black Friday sale on now! Save 50% on PLUS and Brainzy with coupon BLACKFRI. Learn More
ctgirls
ctgirls asks:
Q:

Two 6th grade girls are telling everyone at school that they hate my daughter and have asked two boys if they would punch her in the face. Any advice?

Member Added on Jul 19, 2010
We contacted the administration in regards to this issue and things continued to escalate with this group of girls bullying her even worse and also making up stories to get her in trouble. For example anonymously reporting that my daughter hit one of them, saying she stole from them, and marking up the bathroom stall with our child's name to get her in trouble.
 On 5/21 the VP called my daughter in to warn her that "someone may have seen her have physical contact with another child" and not to tell her parents she was accused, only "put on notice" she was then sent to the councilor because she was so distraught. I went in immediately that afternoon when she came home to tell me to see what happened but was told by the receptionist that both the P and VP were gone for the day (their cars were both in the parking lot) I immediately informed our new superintendent of the issue but still did not get a call Fri. evening, Sat. or Sun. from either the P or VP., or councilor.
We met with the Principal and Vice Principal on 5/24 and they said they were not going to investigate the accusation of our daughter hitting.We said that we did want it investigated (the school has a zero tolerance policy) and know for certain this was done in retaliation.My daughter went to school every day for 5 weeks waiting to be called in so that she could defend herself,the year ended with the administration doing nothing and not once did they ask her if she did any of it or call us to follow up.
Now wh
In Topics: Bullying and teasing, Friendships and peer relationships
> 60 days ago

|

Expert

BarbK
Mar 18, 2010
Subscribe to Expert

What the Expert Says:

I'm glad you daughter trusts you enough to come home and tell you about this situation.  Many young girls don't tell and suffer in silence.  

You need to contact the administration at the school immediately as well as her teachers.  Most schools today have an anti-bullying policy and know what steps need to be taken next.  Don't be afraid to stay on top of the situation.  Ask lots of questions like:
What steps will you take to make sure my daughter is safe?
What will happen to the mean girls?
Will the boys be told the consequences if they do what the girls tell them to do?
Will their parents be contact?
Do I need to fill out any forms reporting this situation?
Can I get a copy of the plan?
Where can I find a copy of the school's bullying policy?

If your daughter is attacked be sure the authorities are contacted and changes are filed.  Whether you go through with any legal action is up to you, but make sure you have a paper trail.  (This goes for the school decisions, too.)  You don't want it to come down to a he said, she said situation with nothing to back up your story.

Unfortunately, bullying goes beyond the school hours.  Cyberbullying often accompanies face-to-face bullying.  This can come in the form of phone calls, texting, emails, online slam books or pages, instant messaging, chat rooms, etc.  Don't be afraid to check your daughter's Facebook page and her friends' pages and text messages she has received as well as sent.

Ask your daughter what she thinks is motivating these girls to act this way.  Did she innocently comment of something they said or did?  Keep the lines of communication open.  Reassure her that you are there for her and will do whatever you can to protect her.

I'm sorry this has happened to your daughter.  Keep after the school and make sure they follow through with their plan.  As dgraab below mentioned, Education has fantastic resources for you to access.  http://www.education.com/topic/school-bullying-teasing/

Hope this helps.

Did you find this answer useful?
5
yes
0
no

Additional Answers (3)

Answer this question