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Anonymous
Anonymous asks:
Q:

Why does my 8-year-old transpose numbers/letters/syllables?

I'm beginning to suspect our third grader's math and reading difficulties have something to do with some mild form of dyscalculia or dyslexia.  

Generally she's a good student and is succeeding in school, but she's usually the last to finish math pages and her reading is often slowed by her misreading familiar words or not being able to interpret syllables accurately when trying to figure out new words.

She will quickly remember answers from the math tables she has committed to memory, but if she doesn't know the answer right away it is likely to take her a very long time, she will resort to her fingers, and she will usually finish with a complete guess or very often the correct result transposed. For instance, if I ask her to add 40 and 8 she might answer "84".  

If she stumbles over "unfinished" and pronounces it "unfished" I will ask her to sound it out and she might continue to repeat "unfished", not being able to pick out the additional syllable after repeated tries.

I know these are simple examples but they come up every night in homework and every day in class.  It's frustrating all of us and finshing last on many assignments is making her self-conscious.  Her teacher is great and is helping her a lot and communicating well with us about her progress.

Does this sound like a fairly common developmental stage or should I consider testing?
In Topics: Cognitive development, Helping my child with school work and home work, Learning disabilities
> 60 days ago

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Expert

BMelton
Jan 14, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

First of all, discuss your concerns with the teacher (if you have not already). Have her eyesight screened by the school nurse. After consultation, you may request a screening for dyslexia.

You also express concerns about your child's level of frustration. She may be mirroring your own feelings about her difficulties, which is understandable. Be patient and continue to work with your daughter. You are an awesome, caring parent! I wish there were more like you!!

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