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angieh
angieh asks:
Q:

adding doubles plus one

ok my 7 year old daughter comes home with her math sheet and it says to add doubles plus one her father and i have a disagreement on what needs to be done here is one example on her worksheet
9+8 =  should the answer make into a double which is
9+9 = 18 right ?

next question  add doubles to 20
example of her homework
5+5 =
and her answer is
5+5 = 10
please help she was crying that she does not want to be wrong on all the answers and it is only day 5 into school
and thanks
In Topics: Helping my child with math
> 60 days ago

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biffycart
biffycart writes:
The doubles plus one are the facts in which one addend is larger than the other by one. Examples 3+4=7, 6+7=13, 5+6=11, 3+2=5. Learning your doubles plus one should involve knowing the doubles and mentally adding the additional one.
> 60 days ago

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smith9456
smith9456 writes:
Doubles are adding the same number together, as with 5+5=10.
With doubles +1, the numbers must be in beside each other in counting order going up or down (ex: 4, 5, 6  and  9, 8, 7). I teach my first graders to say the SMALLEST number, double it, then add one. So, 9+8 would be 8+8=16, +1=17. You must know your doubles facts before this strategy is useful.
> 60 days ago

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face78
face78 writes:
5+5=10 or 5+4=9+1=10
> 60 days ago

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Apocolyptus
Apocolyptus , Teacher writes:
Non-Common Core: 1 + 0 = 1
Common Core: 1 + 0 = 1 + 1 = 2

Non-Common Core: 2 + 1 = 3
Common Core: 2 + 1 = 3 + 1 = 4

Non-Common Core: 3 + 1 = 4
Common Core: 3 + 1 = 4 + 1 = 5

This will prepare your child for knowing the language of the computer in both binary and hexidecimal.

Binary:

128|64|32|16 - 8|4|2|1

0000-0000 = 0
0000-0001 = 1
0000-0010 = 2
0000-0011 = 3
0000-0100 = 4
0000-0101 = 5
0000-0110 = 6
0000-0111 = 7
0000-1000 = 8
0000-1001 = 9
0000-1010 = 10


Hexidecimal:

1    2   3   4   5  6   7  8   9  A   B   C   D  E   F 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 1A 1B 1C 1D 1E 1F 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 2A 2B 2C 2D 2E 2F 30
31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 3F 40
41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 4A 4B 4C 4D 4E 4F 50




Good luck!
> 60 days ago

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CLooney50
CLooney50 writes:
Doubles plus one:   9+8= 8+8+1

Doubles minus one:  9+8=9+9-1

Doubles to 20:
1+1=2
2+2=4
3+3=6
and so on until you reach: 10+10=20

I know I'm late but I hope it helps you and your husband.
> 60 days ago

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bbradleyea
bbradleyea writes:
Well, I have the same question as the person above and see that that there was never an answer given. My grandchild has that same type of homework which is a little confusing.
> 60 days ago

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ladylake
ladylake writes:
I think they are looking for 8+8=16 plus one equals 17
> 60 days ago

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Lisa18967
Lisa18967 writes:
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kballen1
kballen1 writes:
Sorry very late, but I am a teacher and we teach this strategy to our first grade students.  The students first get to know their doubles 1+1, 2+2, 3+3.. and so on.  Once they know these doubles student should be able to add quickly doubles plus one.  Example, if you know 3+3=6 then you should know that 3+4= 7.  This problem could really been seen as 3+3+1.  I hope this helps.
60 days ago

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