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LaTrina
LaTrina asks:
Q:

If autistic children are known for mimicking, then who are they mimicking when they are in the self contained class? Who would they mimic in regular class?

My question is part of a story. My son has been in these self contained classes, every since he has been in pre-school. But, I had to move out and temporarily stay with a friend. During that time I enrolled my son in a school and did not tell them about his autism. He stayed in this school for about a week and I saw a big difference in him. Where as he was not reading sentences in school. He started reading that week. He shocked me with reading and he seemed to be doing well. It made me question should he be in a self contain special education class and what exactly is he getting out of it. I have been working with my son every since he has been in school and after that one week I feel like I have been limiting my son's education and have not been pushing him enough. Also, to ask my self if I was limiting him because I did not think that he could make it in a regular setting class with average children. Now I know I was blind and now I can see. If anybody can help me to get my son in a regular class room setting please [respond]. We should not put limitations on our children. Thank You
In Topics: Autism & Aspergers Syndrome
> 60 days ago

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ashita21
ashita21 , Student writes:
to ur topic question... they mimik nething they hear. there doesnt really seem to be much reason y they pick certain things to mimik and not others.
yes, a lot of times we limit children with special needs thinking they wont be able to cope. but i would think that the people who worked in the diagnosis would have been able to tell u ur child's functioning level.
to get ur child into a regular class, u need to talk to the school and if there is some specialist u are in touch with for you son. this specialist (clinical psychologist, special educator or someone such in the field) would be able to identify ur child's real level of functioning and probably even provide the documentation u need to move him to the regular class.
> 60 days ago

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ilovechefwilliam
ilovechefwi... , Teacher, Caregiver writes:
This is a very good question, but it really depends on the student.  I teach in a self-contained classroom PDD (pervasive developmental disorder- autism unit) k-3.  Many of my students are in my classroom all day long due to behavior.  Some of my students, however, are able to participate in the general education classroom.  It sounds like you  need to call a meeting with your special education teacher and talk about the options that your student might have.  Is there a reason that he is in a self-contained classroom?  Is there a reason that he has not been included before?  I love parents that are advocate for their children!  Good luck!
> 60 days ago

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CanopyJones
CanopyJones writes:
If autistic children are known for mimicking it could be fair to assume that in special classes he displays special needs.  Whereas in a "regular" class  not having the label of "autistic" may help him thrive more.  I was diagnosed with autism (high functioning) at an early age but my mother refused to label me as such.  

I've worked with individuals with dementia and alzheimers and research has shown that when you place an individual in an environment that take on the characteristics of those around them.  

At the end of the day its up to you how much limitation you place on your son.
> 60 days ago

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CookieWhitley
CookieWhitley writes:
My son is now in a regular first grade class, and with effort is about grade level. He doesn’t test well but he is doing better and better every week. He was started in an exceptional pre-school program and started mimicking every odd tick, involuntary movement and even had a large assortment of speech impediments that fooled several evaluators. We were unhappy with the global development delays diagnosis and the autism/sensory issues were present. At 4, he was withdrawing more and more and his pediatrician (and dietitian and endocrinologist) at 2 had said that since he was obese (he was 10lbs at 36 weeks gestation, a month premature) that Splenda, Kool-Aid, and sugar-free Jell-O and yogurt were acceptable and safe substitutes for high calorie snacks. He got worse and worse. The behavior was atrocious and affected my entire household. I put him on an all-natural diet and stopped all sugar substitutes and stopped all services and started him in a regular more at four program, and then he just rolled right into mainstream schooling.
> 60 days ago

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