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momaz
momaz asks:
Q:

My child is being disruptive in class and not doing his work. How can I help him? He's in his 3rd week of kindergarten?

I have received three letters
In Topics: Kindergarten readiness, Helping my child with school work and home work, Discipline and behavior challenges
> 60 days ago

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Expert

BarbK
Aug 18, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

It can be a big adjustment for a child to enter Kindergarten.  There are rules, routines, and lots of structure.  Not saying that is a bad thing, but just the way things are in school.  Since I'm not sure what was in the letters that were sent home, it makes it a little difficult to answer your question.

With that being said, I would request a meeting with your son's teachers.  Find out exactly what behaviors are disruptive.  This can vary from one teacher to another.  For example, some teachers expect students to stay seated and can't get up unless given permission.  Or it might be that your son is not sharing like she expects him to in class.

During your meeting ask her lots of questions such as:
What are your classroom rules?
Which rule(s) is my son breaking?
Is he acting out with other teachers like art, music and PE?
Is he disruptive in the lunchroom, playground or everywhere?
What is her behavior plan?
How can you help her?
Does she want to put your son on a behavior plan and if so, what is it?

Go in with a list and see what she has to say.  And think about if you see these same behaviors while he is at home.  You may want to ask other adults who are close to your son if they see these behaviors as well.

If you have time, volunteer in the classroom.  You can then see for yourself how your son is acting.  Once you know exactly what the problem is, you can help your son correct his behavior and give him alternatives ways to handle situations.

If you'd like to respond and give us more information, we can give you more ideas and suggestions on how to help your son.  Good luck!

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Additional Answers (3)

mayfieldga
mayfieldga , Teacher writes:
I feel for many Males there is stress in the form of more aggression and firmness given them in media, peers at school, etc.  Academics and the fun of learning requires more ease of nature, lower average stress, and more delicate care.  I feel in today's more authoritarian world, boys will be given more authoritarian styles and less ease of nature and care support.  The book "Psychology of Sex Differences" talks about this differential treatment beginning at a young age.  

There is in fact a growing Male Crisis. Many educators are attempting to say boys learn differently, mature more slowly, need more activity, and develop fine motor skills more slowly.  I feel these problems are more stress related and not genetic in nature.  I hope we can learn to see how differential treatment in society is creating many of those problems or a big social problem, not a genetic problem.

I hope we can all begin to use more ease of nature, care, and more softness when teaching students especially Males.  I feel we are presently creating more tension and so more behavior in school by differential treatment

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lynellen
lynellen writes:
Some children over react to their environment.  They may be hyper sensitive to noise, light, and texture (all or just one).  It may be helpful to ask the teacher when the disruptive behavior happens.  For instance, children who are not comfortable with light touch do not do well in circle time or in line with other children who may bump them accidentally.  They need to be placed at the end of the circle line or the very back of the line.  Their behavior may worsen after lunch (noise and texture) or playground (can't settle down easily).  An occupational therapist can help you if your child is having difficutly with environmental sensations. Good books about this subject: Sensational Kids by Lucy Jane Miller and Out of Sync Child by Kranowitz
> 60 days ago

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MAGNETITE
MAGNETITE writes:
Hi,
I am Jennifer Morgan. Your son needs a challenge. Ask the teacher to give him 'a resonsiblity task' for each period. This could be checking who is absent. This will change from being disruptive to one who is held in a lot of esteem by the other learners. His self-esteem will grow.

I have tried this with a teenage learner. He was also allowed to call me by my first name. All this made a huge difference. In fact the teenager was a sweet young man and never gave any problems in class, once he was given responsibility.

Regards,
Jennifer Morgan
> 60 days ago

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