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dolphinlovertwo
dolphinlove... asks:
Q:

How does a child with dyslexia learn how to read?

How does a child with dylexia learn how to read?
In Topics: Dyslexia
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Sylvia HS
Apr 12, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

Hello dolphinlovertwo,

"Dyslexia" is a global term that means "problems with print".  If we define a child as having dyslexia, this just means that we need to find out exactly what difficulties the child is having.  And then we have to design a tailor-made program to teach the student the skills they need to develop.

Is your child having difficulties learning the sounds and the letters of the language?  This type of dyslexia means that we need to give your child more information about how sounds are made and how those sounds are connected to letters and letter sequences.  Your child might have a phonological awareness difficulty, which means that he/she doesn't hear, exactly, how sounds are made and manipulated to form words.  This isn't a hearing problem in terms of the ears, but a hearing/perceptual  weakness in the brain.  You could look at my website:   www.dynamicreadingandwriting.com, to find out how to develop this weakness.  If this weakness isn't addressed early, then students have difficulties analyzing and remembering words throughout their lifetime.

Is your child having difficulties memorizing words?  Then you will want to develop memory skills.  You might look at techniques from Neuro-Linguistic Programming sources.

Is your child having difficulties comprehending what he or she reads?  Then you will want to teach your child how to visualize information, so that he/she can connect imagery to language.  This is a powerful way to develop comprehension.  You might look at Nanci Bell's book "Visualizing and Verbalizing for Language Comprehension and Thinking".

Is your child having difficulties learning how to write down on paper what he or she is thinking orally?  Then you can sketch ideas in organized drawings or thinking maps or graphic organizers, before the child starts writing.  That way, their thinking is done before they begin to write.

Have you had your child assessed by a reading specialist?  This person will be able to discover, specifically, what difficulties your child has with print.

If you secure a tutor, make certain that this person teaches your child how to learn in the most effective ways for him/her.  Some programs are one-size-fits-all, rather than tailor-made for each student.

If you place your child in a special education setting, or have him/her taught in a smaller classroom group for part of the school day, make certain, again, that the school is teaching your child in the most effective ways, and is not using a prescribed program that's not necessarily the best fit for your child.

I've spent nearly forty years working with dyslexic students, from age five to sixty, and have learned over and over, that having dyslexia does NOT mean you can't learn to read and write and spell successfully.

The very best to you.

Sylvia HS
Reading Specialist, Author

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Additional Answers (5)

graham
graham writes:
Hi Trina.

You may find the dyslexia page helpful:

http://www.education.com/reference/topic/SpecialNeeds_Dyslexia/

And more specifically this article is on helping dyslexic children with reading:

http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Helping_Reading

Hope this helps
-graham
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
A child with dyslexia learns to read by following a very structured, systematic, repetitive and structured program.  Look into the Orton-Gillingham approach.  It is a multisensory approach that allows the children to use all of their learning modalities.  They must see it, say it, hear it and move with it.  In Orton-Gillingham the students actually learn the rules of the English language, step by step.  Research it a bit and then see if you can find an Orton-Gillingham program near you.  I'm an Educational Therapist - I use the O-G with dyslexic students and they do quite well with it.  Good Luck to you!
> 60 days ago

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BruceDeitrickPrice
BruceDeitri... , Teacher writes:
But does the child even have dyslexia? That's the first question.
See article, and decide whether it applies.

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lisa.m.v0894
lisa.m.v0894 writes:
There are many ways and techniques to help a dyslexic person learn to read and write. One of the ways is to put any information you would like them to read on tinted paper, find out what color the person finds it most easy to read from or write on, and print in that color, for example, I find it easier to read from and write on pink paper, so all of my college work, was put onto pink paper, there is also something called an overlay, that you can put on top of white paper. This is really helpful and allows you to concentrate better. Also highlight any important information with a coloured highlighter. Hope this helps
> 60 days ago

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TeacherandParent
TeacherandP... writes:
It's not easy and teaching a dyslexic child phonics doesn't seem to help. Dyslexic people read 'by sight' - they can't break a word apart or sound out words. Their brains see the whole word not the parts of the word and if they hit a word they don't know, they can't sound it out.

Flash cards with frequent use words can help. Also - any child should be reading as best they can for 15 - 20 minutes every day. Find a picture book if needed with one word on the page and have the child read that and other books like that. That will help to teach the child words. As he becomes a better reader, you can get slightly harder books but the books a child reads at night for reading practice should be easy books! That's how the child builds confidence and speed in reading.

And read aloud - or if you're not a comfortable aloud reader - listen to books on tape together with your child for 15-20 minutes every day. Listening to a book being read helps a child to build their vocabulary and their familiarity with literature.
58 days ago

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