Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
Black Friday sale on now! Save 50% on PLUS and Brainzy with coupon BLACKFRI. Learn More
education.com
education.com asks:
Q:

Does your child believe in Santa Claus?

If your child does believe:
Was it you who encouraged your child to believe in Santa Claus? How long do you plan to continue to support this belief/tradition?

If your child doesn't believe:
Is that due to a conversation you (or someone else) had with your child? If yes, at what age did that conversation occur, and did gifts from Santa disappear thereafter?

Thanks for sharing!
In Topics: Parenting / Our Family, Communicating with my child (The tough talks), Family fun / holiday celebrations
> 60 days ago

|
malaysiah3
malaysiah3 writes:
yes my child believe in santa and she is only 4 years old
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
1
no
shopgirl11
shopgirl11 writes:
No my child does not believe in Santa Claus. I think he stopped thinking that he was real when he was about 9. Many kids at school said he was not real so that sparked the thought that there was not one. My child told me at one point which i thought was funny that there was no way one man could get all those presents delivered in one night and how crazy that sounded.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
0
no
dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
After our daughter was exposed to Santa as a toddler through popular culture and members of my family, I shared the details of the story with her, and he's been visiting our household since she was two. She leaves him cookies, and he leaves her presents and sometimes a note acknowledging her good deeds of the year.

Now that she's seven, she's started to doubt his existence, and I've been struggling with how to respond. Very interested to hear from other parents about how they've handled the Santa tradition with their children through the ages.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
3
yes
0
no
mum2009
mum2009 writes:
Both my children believe in santa and yes I was the one who made them believe and would like them to believe for as long as possible as it is all part of the fun and magic of Christmas. I hide all the presents and say I have sent them to santa and then when they are asleep Christmas eve I take all the presents and place them under the tree, their faces light up Christmas morning when they see the presents under the tree which is a lovely thing to see. I dread the day they find out it's not real but at the end of the day it's how they remember their Christmas' and how special it was for them and hopefully pass that experience on to their children when they have them.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
5
yes
0
no
tdsutherland
tdsutherland , Parent writes:
My son is 3 1/2 and I've never really pushed the idea of Santa, but he seems to sort of believe. I try to play it fairly low-key, though he did leave out cookies & a note last Christmas. I never believed in Santa as a child and I feel like I "missed out" on that. On the other hand, my spouse still harbors resentment towards his parents for the lie.  Given that, I don't play up the naughty/nice thing at all and we give one "Santa" gift and the rest are from us.  It seems like my son just sort of sees Santa as a character, not necessarily a real person.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
3
yes
0
no
Loddie1
Loddie1 , Parent writes:
A world without Santy Claus. How grim a world it would be. Well, my daughter is 11 and I refuse to tell her Santa Claus is not real for several reasons. To me, Santa Claus is based on a real person (St. Nicholas) who in fact was real at one time. He was a very giving soul and did not want others to know it was he who was giving to people in need. Christmas is a time of sharing with one another and with people who truly "need" items. It is also a time where magic and wonder can spark the imaginations of really everyone. So when my daughter asks me if he is real, I refuse to tell her no. In fact, I won't tell her no. I won't say much at all and let her come to her own conclusions about it. But I have told her who the real St. Nick was and what he did.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
9
yes
0
no
reprah517
reprah517 writes:
no when i was a kid i did not i asked my mom when i was 3 and she said no so that was the end of that
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
1
no
eddie
eddie writes:
Are trying to say there's no Santa Claus.....? There still is for me and I get into the movies for 1/2 price. Don't let the spirit of Santa ever die.
Merry Christmas  :) e
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
4
yes
1
no
D.O1421
D.O1421 writes:
Yes she does
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
1
no
dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
Hi, Here's a new related article from Education.com's editorial team...

"Is Santa Real?" How to Deal with the Christmas Question
http://www.education.com/magazine/article/the-santa-question/

Enjoy!
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
0
no
Vamp_girl6
Vamp_girl6 , Student writes:
Heeeeeeeeeeey.... What up? I'm 16 and I have NEVER believed in Santa Clause, so I'm not going to try to make my kids believe in Santa Claus.... WAIT!!!! who's Santa Clause???
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
3
no
New'New
New'New , Student writes:
Santa Clause is a made up charater for children, for the religion of Christainty on Christmas (December 25)

But when I was little I stop believing in Santa at around 7 because I found our presents in my moms closet wrapped and she told us the truth.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
1
no
AndreaP
AndreaP writes:
My 8 yr old is skeptical, but he has not asked me outright.  He has asked about the Tooth Fairy, just a few weeks ago, and told me he didn't think she was real, but I didn't want to spoil his Santa belief with just a few weeks to go, so I tried to skirt that issue.  He also has a 5 yr old sister who is a believer so that was my other issue.  However if he really pushed, it I would tell him.

However, this summer we will probably have a talk.  I'd rather he hear it from me, than on the school bus.  

I think older children believing in Santa is ridiculous.  They start shaving their legs these days and having monthly cycles at age 11, etc.  yet they still want to be children.  It's one or the other.  Also, I firmly believe that at some age it interferes with their belief in God.  Parents lie about Santa, why not God?  Maybe that's just the scientific skeptic in me talking.

If they still want to have gifts from "Santa", that's fine, as long as they understand.  BTW I was 7 when I stopped believing when I found wrapped gifts before Christmas.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
1
no
GoodGrief
GoodGrief writes:
Do what you want, but don't tell me that you're just "pretending," when you lie to your child about Santa. Pretending is when all parties involved know that the situation is make-believe. When one party deceives another, that is LYING. Do we not want our children to realize that basic principle of fairness?
If you think I'm trying to impose MY personal morals upon YOU, by simply presenting this premise, try telling your extended family that you won't be lying to your child about Santa and see how much REAL pressure you get, from THAT side of the debate! Yikes!
If you're tempted to think your child will "miss out" by not believing in Santa, think about this: At some point they will be mocked by older children, for believing. And they will be very angry that YOU SET THEM UP for that torment.
You also can't predict how strongly they will react, when they learn that you have lied to them.
A few years ago, my favorite cousin died a miserable death, after many years of misery. He died an athiest. As a teen, he told his Christian parents "First you told me that Santa could see everything I did, and would reward me. Now you tell me the same thing about some guy named Jesus. I don't buy it."
Speaking of Jesus: HE said "Whomever causes one of these little ones to stumble, it would be better for them if they had a millstone tied about their neck, and were cast into the depths of the sea."
If you believe that Jesus Christ is God, you might want to think carefully about what HE will think of you stumbling your child by lying to them.
I explained to my child that the real St. Nick was a generous man who gave to the poor. We then emulated his example, by making Christmas a season of looking for ways to express love to the lonely and generosity to the needy.
While other children were learning greed, my child developing a thankful, generous and caring heart. And that is a gift that has kept on giving to her and to everyone in her life.  
That was my personal choice, and I have no regrets.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
1
no
Delfina28
Delfina28 writes:
I believe in Santa Claus.  It's a great story and a great lesson of giving during a time of celebrating the respective holy days. I also believe it's important to believe in things one cannot see or hear and to have faith whether it's rooted in religion, tradition, or stories that we pass on.  My three children were encouraged to believe in Santa Claus and the elder children naturally came to terms with the reality but never tattled to the younger that there wasn't really a jolly fat man who tumbled down the chimney. It was simply too much fun to believe.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
0
no
Answer this question
Anonymous
Welcome!
Please sign in.
Not a Member? Join now!