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wattsfamily
wattsfamily asks:
Q:

What chores should be paid for , if you already teach responsibilty of own space?

My husband and I have been planning on starting an alllowance for the children but I am coming to a road block as to what chores should be paid for ? They already make beds and clean up after each project or play session because it is required that they maintain a clean space .on top of that they clear their places at the table and put away their laundry when its cleand !! i know i am truely blessed to have this in order but i need a little help so if its out there id love some feed back thank you and GOD  bless .
In Topics: Chores, allowance, and money management
> 60 days ago

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lkauffman
lkauffman writes:
Greetings,

It sounds like your children are already moving in the right direction, in terms of learning responsibility and the value of cleanliness. Congratulations on your hard work so far!

Most psychologists recommend that parents make an effort to choose age-appropriate chores, as well as limit the number of chores to help children feel successful upon completing their chores. Experts often recommend one chore for each age of the child.

For some ideas regarding specific chores, take a look at the following resources:

Chores:
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Kids_Chores/

Allowance:
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Allowances_Children/

Allowance and Money Management Information Center:
http://www.education.com/reference/topic/LifeSkills_AllowanceAndMoneyManagement/

Good luck!

L. Compian, Ph.D.
Counseling Psychologist
Education.com Reference Team
> 60 days ago

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EmoVampire
EmoVampire , Student writes:
It rlly depens on the chore they do and how well they do it.
> 60 days ago

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meveronica21
meveronica21 writes:
Great question. At my house I don't pay for chores. Chores are expected to be done. Living together and being part of a family everyone needs to help one another to make life easier. But what I do pay for is going above and beyond regular chores. I have my system: Once all normal chores are complete and acceptable then the child may notice something else that needs to be done. The child comes to me and asks to do that particular job, I than will pay for that job. Reason behind it is: Mom and dad do not get paid to clean their own house. Children won't either. In the job market as adults we need to go search for our job then ask to be hired. Children need to search for job and then ask to do job. This way the children will learn what is expected of them in the real-world. I hope this helps.
> 60 days ago

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BigSis
BigSis writes:
Hi,

My parents gave me an allowance (when I was 13-18) and it would be for helping out with chores that weren't normally my "responsibilities" such as vacuuming, dusting and cleaning the house, washing the car, doing yard work, and helping with other house projects that would come up.
> 60 days ago

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Karenmom
Karenmom writes:
Hi wattsfamily,

This is a good question!  You have already taught your children to be orderly and share in the responsibility of the chores.  I personally don't believe in paying for things that we expect.  Even in adulthood as they earn pay for their work, they will not be awarded pay for cleaning their workspace, washing their car or washing their laundry.  These are tasks that is required for individual responsibility.

However, I do believe in teaching children about savings, investments, budgets, etc. and the way to teach that is through managing their own money for the items that they want, need, so I believe in an allowance, but not for chores,  instead the allowance is for living expenses.

You can begin by sitting with each child and discussing costs that they create such as, ball practice, dance classes, that new shirt, new video game or toy, gas money (whatever the case may be) and then create a budget.  Decide how much money they need to be able to pay for their expenses, decide how much of their expenses you will pay for.  For example: you will pay for dance lessons (this way they understand what they cost, but you are giving them this), you will pay for their school wardrobe, but will not pay for an extra pair of shoes that they don't need, only want.  This means that they would want to save for that.

Next, you decide what should be their allowance and this is based on what you can afford and feel is an reasonable amount.  I've provided links to help you decide what is a reasonable allowance.

Next, help your child prepare a budget.  Discuss how to save money, we don't want to live on a fixed budget, we all want to have extra spending money, so now is the time to teach this by explaining to save basically 10% (a good start) of the allowance into savings before budgeting the rest into their expense accounts.  You may want to visit a local bank and open a savings account.  Most banks only require a $5 minimum (this would be a sign-on bonus gift for the kids to begin their journey in saving money), just as in adulthood, we often get a sign-on bonus to take the job.  Discuss other forms of savings such as certificates of deposits, etc., college funds (the bank should be able to assist with any questions you have and guide you to make the best decision for your child).

Now, is the best part.  Give them their allowance weekly, bi-weekly or monthly.  Just as adults get paid and let them begin managing their money.  As their savings grow, discuss other investment possibilities and even a checking account.  I believe that teenagers should learn to balance and take responsibility for a checking account/debit card.  You should also (at a later time, of course) discuss credit cards, loans, the types of loans, interest rates, late fees and explain how to calculate their assets and credits.  

You should be proud of yourself.  You've successfully taught your children responsibility for organization and the importance of a clean environment.  Now you are preparing them for adulthood and financial responsibility.  No deadbeats around you!  Kudos.

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Jurmufam
Jurmufam writes:
HI:)
We had the same problem the kids were already doing a lot of the the things most families do to get their allowance.  Also we are very much in support that as a family you help each other and do your part to support the family because we love each other not so that we can get "paid".  So we got a Jelly Jar and some stones (it takes 40 stones to fill the jelly jar it is just a small jar).  With each thing they did above the "normal part of the family" stuff we give them anything from 1 to 4 stones.  For example we live in MI so when is snows our son (6 yrs old) shovels the sidewalk and if he does this on his own we give him 4 stones.  Our daughter (4 yrs old) takes care of the dishes that she can reach after they are washed and does this on her own to help she will get 4 stones.  We have a dog and they both will "clean up" outside after the dog they get 2 stones each.  Our mailbox is a distance down the driveway our son gets the mail 1 stone.  Also we added good manners they will get 1 stone.  They can also loss 2 stones if they do something like lie, be mean to each other (hit, yell at each other, ect), or something along that line. When the jar is full they will get money or something they have been wanting that is compared in price to the money they would get.  Every week the jar is emptied and if they do not fill it they do not get "paid".  I am a stay at home mom but was given this idea from an out of the home working mother and father.  It works for us and the kids do not let you forget that they are owed the stones.  Good luck with whatever you figure out.  It may take a couple different ideas to get what works for your kids.  It did with us:)
> 60 days ago

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