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Where do we get E. coli from?

Asked by visitor Tasha in commenting on the project: http://www.education.com/science-fair/article/w...

E. coli is needed to complete the science fair project. Where can you get e. coli bacteria from to complete the project?

In Topics: Science fair
> 60 days ago

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Expert

greenprof2
Dec 9, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

One form of E.coli is pathogenic - nasty stuff! - and I would imagine you would need the assistance of a university or medical researcher to obtain it from a biological supply house such as Carolina Biological. To properly manipulate bacteria, you need aspetic techiques and specific tools. The bacteria also requires a specific media to grow in, and incubaters at 37 degrees. You might check with a biologist at your local community college, or a public health lab.

Michael Bentley, EdD, Expert Panelist

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Additional Answers (3)

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> 60 days ago

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46 days ago

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john18967
john18967 writes:
Escherichia coli [the species name is never capitalized] was the laboratory everygerm for decades, being the target for genetic study in simple mitosis cell division, the bacterial form of sexual reproduction, and as victim of bacteriophage viral infection and transfer of bacterial genes (transduction). A normal member of everyone's intestinal flora, indeed the classic indicator, only recently has a variant been linked to food-borne infections. This cute plush version resembles a jellyfish with tentacles but the strings represent flagella, the means by which the microbe swims in its fluid environment. The real germ does not have eyes, of course, but this critter with an inquisitive gaze can entertain and educate. As other microbe toys in this series, it would make a fine gift for budding scientists, nurses, and physicians. I can envision a collection of such plush microbes in a pediatrician's office. Adults can have fun with them, too.
45 days ago

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