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Sadia786
Sadia786 asks:
Q:

Confused.com!!!!!

My son is just finishing second grade. We have moved from Pakistan 1 and half years ago. He's English was very good. He has done a fabulous job of settling into American way of life,  he is trying his best. He is now 8. He's reading was extremely poor in grade 1. But now he is at DRA 28. He's second grade teacher has been of no help. Every time I emailed her, asking her questions about his progress, she was in the least bit interested! She did always complain that he doesn't follow oral and written directions. I asked on many occasions why she thinks that, her answer was I don't know, or rather I don't care!!. We are working on it at home with him now and hope it gets better. I've noticed that he sometimes forgets what he has learned ie if he learned how to regroup subtractions in January Nd if asked again now it would be vague in his head or if i told him yesterday what a contraction is in grammar, he would forget the next day, he basically is not great at expressing in writing what he is thinking or saying orally. Does this sound like a learning disability? He seems fine, did well in the year, leaped in reading. Pls advise! Teacher was useless!!!
In Topics: School and Academics
> 60 days ago

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greenprof2
greenprof2 writes:
I am sorry for your experience with your son's teacher. However, he is lucky to have a mother who looks out for him. You do not specify where he is a student. Many states require schools to have guidance counselors who may be consulted for students to be evaluated for learning disabilities. There is not enough information for me to judge your son's situation but his school or the district's central office should have referral services that can help you find out. My own daughter was not diagnosed with a learning disability until 2nd grade, and she turned out great after getting help. Good luck and don't be discouraged (yet)!
> 60 days ago

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Cici_Vivi
Cici_Vivi , Student writes:
Find what is his interest and train it.
> 60 days ago

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missgigimeowcat
missgigimeo... , Teacher, Parent writes:
I am a secondary certified teacher who is adding an English as a Second Language endorsement to my teaching certificate. I am also the wife of an Indian immigrant to the United States.

I would advise you to request that your school district assess your son's reading and math levels, especially his oral and written language abilities. Oral and written expression may be difficult for him as English is his second language. Though your son may be able to read English, it may be difficult for him to "translate" his thoughts into an expressive form. It may be difficult for him to remember the large amount of information he has learned if he is spending much of his time focusing on what is before him at the time.

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missgigimeowcat
missgigimeo... , Teacher, Parent writes:
I am sorry, as I had difficulty with completing my previous answer.

Often ESL students do take more time to learn new concepts. Contractions are difficult for many students, even those who are native speakers. Also, regrouping in subtraction is not the easiest concept to learn. It may be a situation in which your son had a teacher who, for whatever reason, was unable or unwilling to work with your son individually or did not have any experience working with an ESL student. Unfortunately, many teachers are ill-prepared for such situations.

I would advise you to contact your local school board office to find out if there is a process for ESL testing in your district. If not, contact your state's department of education to request further assistance. Do not be afraid to advocate for your child.

ESL students do not have to be placed in separate classrooms, but they, like any other student, do have to have resources made available to them that will enable them to progress academically.

If you still feel that your child may have a learning disability, request assessments be conducted for this, as well.

Good luck and I hope this answer helped you and your son.
> 60 days ago

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parvo
parvo writes:
You need to take a firm step; ask the  teacher again about your child's performance if he/she does not respond then contact the principle to take an appropriate action.You can also ask the school to observe your child for any disability..
> 60 days ago

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