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idmklady
idmklady asks:
Q:

My daughter was just diagnosed as Broad Spectrum Autism High Function.  What is that?

Does anyone else out there have a clue what this really means? I have a beautiful very intelligent daughter who I am now being told is not so much ADHD as she has this other thing....I would very much appreciate any other information from other parents....I am lost. This is a whole new world for me. Thanks
In Topics: ADHD & attention issues, Autism & Aspergers Syndrome
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Wayne Yankus
Dec 5, 2008
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What the Expert Says:

The word "spectrum" implies a range and many young people with Autism Spectrum Disorders do quite well in life and are quite bright.  children with ADD as many as 40% have additional medical/educational issues and that is true of young people with ASD.  Start by asking the physician who made the diagnosis.  Another option is go to the American Academy of Pediatrics website www.aap.org and look up ASD. Finally, a physician who is certified in developmental pediatrics is one who could help you better understand this complex diagnosis.

Wayne Yankus, MD, FAAP
expert panelist: pediatrics

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Additional Answers (3)

Mom of a diva
Mom of a diva writes:
Aspergers is considered a high functioning autism. My daughter was diagnosed when she was in the 1st grade. My advice to you is to have alot of patience with her. My daughter also is very smart but has high anxiety with Math and with testing. She is 12 now, some things have gotten better , some things have changed. Keep in contact with the school make sure her IEP has everything to accommodate her and don't be afraid to change it when ever you think things aren't working. I've even had to change teachers because they were not willing to go by the accommodations in the IEP and thought their way would work better. A teacher can not change things without consulting the parent and having a meeting. You are your child's advocate so don't let anyone try to push you around. Also keep in contact with your child's SPED teacher, they are the eyes and ears at the school. If you do it right, just about everyone at the school will know you and will know you are completely involved with your child. One more thing, getting calls from the school and getting notes will be an everyday thing especially at first.
> 60 days ago

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drbigred7
drbigred7 writes:
I know this must blow your mind cause it blew mine when I was told almost the same words you have said.  My daughter is now 11 yrs old.  I was first told when she was about 7 yrs. old that she had brain damage.  Which was not the proper words for that dr. to use when he was telling me.  Then she was diagnosed with aspergers syndrome which made alot more sense when I did the research.  I was first told she only had a speech problem.  Then came ADHD then came OCD and tics.  I know this must be overwhelming but the only advice I can tell you is to do research yourself.  On the computer, books at the library and try not to deny because that will only make you crazier. research...research...research  that's about all I can say,,  Good Luck
> 60 days ago

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caly91
caly91 writes:
I have high functioning autism. I get good grades in school and even take AP classes. My education is in no way affected by having autism. What is difficult for me is communicating with others.  I find it hard and even frustrating trying to read people's body language or relate to people on an advanced level. I prefer being with a small group of friends and often get aggitated or uncomfortable in large crowds of people esp. when I don't know anybody there. I do not adapt well to sudden changes I am much more comfortable following a routine closely.  I am also sensitive to bright lights and harsh sounds (such as a fire alarm).

Little things can be frustrating or aggrivating to a child/adult with Autism. You will quickly learn what may set your daughter off. Others will have to learn too. Teachers and her friends will catch on as they get to know her, but new situations may be difficult for her to approach.
> 60 days ago

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