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danielle62401
danielle62401 asks:
Q:

My daughter is having problems with reading and grammar.  How can I help?

My daughter is 6 years old. She will be 7 at the end of June. She is in first grade. She has been diagnosed with ADD. She is having great difficulty learning to read and has a problem with grammar. I am having a hard time getting her to comprehend. Her school isn't helping much. They are modifying her papers and now the subject of retention has been brought up. I would like some help and maybe some ideas as to how I can help her catch on. I don't want her to fail. I want to do everything that I can to help her learn to read and understand what she is reading. If anyone has any advice, please let me know.
In Topics: Helping my child with reading
> 60 days ago

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garg_t
garg_t writes:
Hi Danielle,

This must be a very trying time for not only you but for your daughter as well. I had students, in my first and third grade classes, who struggled with the same sorts of problems. My first word of advice is be patient. This may sound lofty and it is, but if you are patient and show your daughter you believe in her, she will at least have a solid self-esteem.

Ok, so what can you and the school do to best help your daughter? Well, first look at retention as a helpful thing. In the US we have in our society been ingrained to thinking that retention is bad. Research shows it can be beneficial if only the student has a teacher who is completely different than the one they currently have. If her teacher now does lots of worksheets then next year you would want a teacher who is vastly different, one who does more inquiry and hands activities.

I would suggest you have her do work for 5 or 10 mins. at a time. Let her take breaks in between homework assignments. I would also suggest you two read together. Get books you know she can read and take turns. You could also have her read the short page you read to her. As for writing have her tell you a story and write it down. Then have her rewrite the story she told you. This might help her better see how she can write because she told you a story and the words will be familiar to her.

I hope this helps and I wish you and your daughter the best!
> 60 days ago

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starchaser
starchaser writes:
Hi Danielle,

I have a daughter who is 7 and she has difficulty in reading and grammar as well. She is in 2nd grade. They wanted to hold her back last year and I refused. I was held back in 1st grade and it hurt my self esteem. Some kids are OK with it, but a lot are not. A lot of teachers if you go online will say not too because when they get to second grade they will go through a maturity growth. My daughter did in a lot of areas, but not so much in the reading. She is being tutored once a week and it hasn't helped. The school was considering putting her in another local school where they have classrooms of 8 kids with behavior and academic issues. No way! She needs to learn how to read in her school. They need to do their job. She hasn't progressed much all year. Who's fault is that? When I was in elementary school we had a special reading teacher for kids who had trouble reading. They had reading with him for an hour a day and they were fine. All these services today and they still can't get it right. They need to go back to basics. I will have my daughter's IEP meeting and let them know they need to teach her. If your child is having problems they need to provide a special reading teacher to read with her every day for an hour. I won't let my school ship her out to another school because they failed as a school in teaching her. Putting her with kids with issues will destroy her. Taking her out of an environment that she is so happy with is terrible. Where do they get their common sense from. You want to teach a child to behave you put them with kids who behave. You want them to learn to read you put them with kids who can. Learn by example. Fight your school for the help she needs. You are her voice. If you say nothing they will do as they want. Good luck!!!!
> 60 days ago

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HeatherPeterson124
HeatherPete... writes:
Why not get her a tutor that can teach her and supervise her very well? English program and grammar will help her as well.

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sixxfooter88
sixxfooter88 writes:
I think having a tutor is a great idea, but I also think that you reading with her everyday for an hour will also be very helpful to her.  Start going to the library weekly, they offer many different reading activities and alot of them are totally free.  You are your child's first teacher, you know her better than anyone else.  Read to her often, talk to her, and listen to her when she speaks, asks her questions that require her to answer in complete sentences. I wish you all the best, good luck with you daughter.
> 60 days ago

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Kate_R
Kate_R writes:
Children's writers relish using language well; of course they do, that is an essential tool of their work. Spelling, punctuation, regular and irregular verbs and everything else about grammar underpin all that they do. (It is odd that anyone thinks it doesn't.) then it will  be easier to write expository essays

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Carsonctf
Carsonctf writes:
OK, first of all Danielle remember to breathe:-) This is a difficult issue. The thing you have to take in consideration is that most public schools don't have the money or resources that we had when we were in elementary school, and despite what someone said before me a good teacher can't do much with limited resources and increasing class sizes. This means that we have to do more at home. Besides that, the single most important thing that you can do as a parent right now is support your daughter. If you get angry and loud, or frustrated about her progress then you need to remove yourself for the situation for a few minutes to calm down because if you start to get loud and angry they are going to internalize it. Don't underestimate the power of self esteem and a good support system because if she starts to think that she can't do it then she will take every mistake that she makes as proof that she can't. I would set a time to talk to her teacher and see if you guys can come up with an individual plan for your daughter, but remember she might be stretched to thin to begin with. Just keep up working with her at home and using any resources that you can find. Remember that this is only now and she will learn all of this so be patient, support her, talk with her teacher about an individualized plan, and work with her at home.
> 60 days ago

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TeacherandParent
TeacherandP... writes:
Children need reading practice but in easy books - school usually has children reading right at the edge of where they read but to build confidence and speed with reading - she should be reading 15-20 minutes every day in books that are as easy for her as possibly can be. Even if the book has one word or one sentence on the page. 15-20 minutes every day reading in books she finds as easy as possible - that will build her reading skills.
And read aloud to her - from a harder book - that will build her listening skills and her vocabulary. If you don't like reading aloud, get some books on tape from your local library.
It's not uncommon for children who don't read well to also have problems with grammar - they are both language-based tasks. As your daughter's reading improves, her grammar will likely improve too. She needs some extra time.
They cannot retain her unless you agree to it - you and your daughter have rights. They have no legal right to retain her in 1st grade unless you agree to it. It's actually not a bad thing to have an extra year to catch up. These days they don't 'fail' children in a grade - they try to give them an edge by having them stay an extra year in a grade.

Get her some easy books - as easy as possible - from your local library and have her read every day, 15-20 minutes a day. Sit down with your own book and read that while she's reading. There's good research to show that children who see their parents reading at home are more likely to pick up books on their own at home and read.
57 days ago

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