Anonymous
Anonymous asks:
Q:

Can you get disability for being dyslexic?

CAN YOU GET DISERBILTY FOR BEING DYSLEXIA
In Topics: Dyslexia
> 60 days ago

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dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
Hello, The U.S. Social Security Administration (SSA) has guidelines for determining if you are eligible for disability benefits.

Here are some resources you may find helpful...

How To Get Dyslexia Disability Insurance:
http://www.ehow.com/how_4844385_dyslexia-disability-insurance.html

Learning Disabilities and Response to Intervention:
http://www.education.com/special-edition/learning-disabilities-rti/

Dyslexia info center:
http://www.education.com/topic/dyslexia-children/

Thanks for asking!
> 60 days ago

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seeva1857
seeva1857 writes:
Dyslexics have a disability.

The bad news is they have to live with it life long.

The good news is they are ways to cope with it.

Dyslexics are special and more creative individuals.

Read the following posting on how special their brains are - and what alternate learning strategies will work for them.

http://dyslexiatreatments.org/dyslexia-treatment-alternate-learning-strategies/

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vijay43
vijay43 writes:
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> 60 days ago

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john18967
john18967 writes:
Any parent of a dyslexic child soon learns two things: 1) their child is very bright but thinks and learns differently from peers, 2) the educational system does not serve them very well. Our struggles as parents are often immense as we work to advocate for our dyslexic child in a society that, more often than not, discards a dyslexic intellect as inferior and unlikely to succeed in life. This wonderful book explains through example after example how the complete opposite is the case. Dyslexic minds may have troubles with conventional ways of "doing things" but it is for that reason that they have been the pivotal forces behind discoveries and innovations that have led our culture forward for centuries (if not millennia).
how to see dyslexia as a forest, rather than as the trees or branches we are most familiar with: the humiliating branch of learning to read slowly, the embarrassing branch of illegible handwriting, the exasperating branch of never quite being able to recall a multiplication fact. When dyslexia is seen as a forest, it is, well -- breathtaking.

In the central section of the book, the Eides show that there are 4 broad patterns of strength in the dyslexic brain: Material thinking, helpful for engineers and others who need to visualize in 3-D; Interconnected thinking, great for seeing connections rather than simply facts in isolation; Narrative thinking, which is good not just for storytellers, and Dynamic thinking, a truly amazing skill to make predictions based on incomplete information. The 4 talents together spell: MIND. Yet those strengths are the flip side of the familiar, painful dyslexic challenges. The Eides devoted a chapter to each of the traits. First they discuss the strengths, then they move on to the trade-offs that come with each talent. Their discussions are clear, packed with information, and very logical. I learned a lot from this part of the book - and I knew a fair amount about dyslexia to begin with - but I needed to stop and think after each chapter. I found the logical and clear movement of their argument from strengths to challenges to be (again) breathtaking.

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