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graham65
graham65 asks:
Q:

Why do things dissolve differently in water than turpentine

My Primary School child has done a experiment at school, mixing sugar, tea, drinking chocolate, with turpentine and needs to explain what and why things happened. But she hasn't been taught yet about molecular structure and positive and negative ions.
What is a grade 7 response?
In Topics: Helping my child with science
> 60 days ago

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Expert

greenprof2
Nov 12, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

I'm a little confused by your question. Where I live Grade 7 is in middle school. An explanation for a 13 year old would be very different than one for a primary level student. Indeed, I'd struggle myself trying to explain this to, say, a 2nd grader! The 13 year old however could understand that the water molecule, H2O, is a unique and unusual structure in nature and is bi-polar, with a + and - charge on different ends of the structure. Turpentine does not have such a structure. Because of its structure water is called the universal solvent and can dissolve many solids that petroleum-based liquids like turpentine cannot.
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Additional Answers (1)

Mozee
Mozee writes:
The chemical make-up of water and turpentine is different. Also one is heavier than the other so dissolving materials will be altered. Water is h2O - I do not know the chemical for turpentine but know from experience it is thicker than water and probably has an oil in it - remember oil and water do not mix
> 60 days ago

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