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cyndiseiler
cyndiseiler asks:
Q:

Is there an easy rule for teaching difference for there, their, they're?

In Topics: Helping my child with writing
> 60 days ago

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Hugo Sierra
Hugo Sierra writes:
homophone |ËhämÉËfÅn; ËhÅmÉ-|
noun
each of two or more words having the same pronunciation but different meanings, origins, or spelling, e.g., new and knew .
⢠each of a set of symbols denoting the same sound or group of sounds.

"there" denoting a place
"their" denoting belonging, possesion
"they're contraction of the two words they and are.

2 Don't confuse their, they're, and there. Their is a possessive pronoun:: I like their new car. Theyâre is a contraction of 'they are': | theyâre parking the car. There is an adverb meaning 'at that place': | park the car over there.
> 60 days ago

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mommapao
mommapao writes:
I told mine to associate there with here since it's the same with a "h." They know that here is a place/location so there is a place/location too.  For "their," I pointed out that there are two different vowels so the word belongs to more than one thing.  For "they're,"  I tell them to always fill in "they are" anytime they use there, they're or their to see if it make sense.  If it does, that's when to use it.
> 60 days ago

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