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Mama4
Mama4 asks:
Q:

What is the endomembrane system, and why is the mitochondria not part of it?

In Topics: Helping my child with science
> 60 days ago

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Expert

greenprof2
Oct 12, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

Hi -
The endomembrane system is composed of the various membranes inside the cytoplasm within cells that have nuclei (which are called "eukaryotic" cells). The membranes divide the cell into functional and structural compartments, the latter being called organelles. The endomembrane system does not include the membranes of mitochondria or chloroplasts because these objects have separate DNA and at one time were actually parasitic bacteria that evolved into symbionts and are not integral to the cell. This amazing realization came to Lynn Margolis, a scientist who was married at one time to Carl Sagan! The evolution of the cell is a fascinating tale!

Michael Bentley, Expert Panelist
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Additional Answers (1)

Pujabhatia
Pujabhatia writes:
Series of interacting organelles between the nucleus and plasma membrane
Makes and modifies lipids and proteins
Recycles molecules and particles such as worn-out cell parts, and inactivates toxins

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