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maryma
maryma asks:
Q:

Does anyone have experience with a 3 1/3 year old who cannot speak?

My grandson is 31/2 is a great child happy and will seems very smart.  He has had issues with ear problems when an infant and had tubes inserted at a very young age.  His problem is he cannot speak, he tries but cannot form his words.  They are looking into a problem with his back pallet but it seems they are just spinning their wheels and  I along with my daughter are getting very frustrated.  Noah gets very upset when we cannot understand what he is trying to tell us.  He thinks that he is speaking correctly.  He will repeat a story that his sister,age 5, has told us with the same tones and expression she has used but it is not with pronounced words.  Noah is does not have very good coordination.  I would like some info and advice on where we can go or look for some help for Noah.
In Topics: Physical development, Medical problems
> 60 days ago

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Expert

mheyman
Sep 9, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

This is an important problem to addess;  indeed, "Speech and language delay affects 5% to 8% of preschool children, often persists into the school years, and may be associated with lowered school performance and psychosocial problems."  See link that is attached.

Agree with above suggestions to consider hearing issues.  The issue regarding delayed speech development should be discussed with your pediatrician for further testing, which certainly will involve hearing tests, and consideration for speech therapy, ENT evaluation, and possibly even a pediatric gastroenterologist to consider upper GI (e.g., gastroesophageal reflux, or GERD) problems.
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Additional Answers (8)

Edu-Katherine
Edu-Katherine writes:
Hi Mary,<br />
<br />
I'm sorry to hear about your grandson. Have you looked at taking him to a speech pathologist? What have the experts said so far?<br />
<br />
Edu-Katherine<br />
Community Team<br />
> 60 days ago

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kellysfinn
kellysfinn , Parent writes:
Hi Mary,<br />
<br />
A great article that discusses Speech delays and therapy is: http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Delayed_Speech/<br />
<br />
I understand your frustration, but I agree that the best first step is to take him to a speech pathologist.<br />
<br />
Good luck,<br />
Kelly<br />
> 60 days ago

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Mika
Mika writes:
Hello,<br />
You may be able to find some help or understanding through speech therapy or occupational therapy in your grandson's area. &nbsp;Good luck.<br />
> 60 days ago

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lkauffman
lkauffman writes:
Hi Mary,<br />
<br />
How frustrating this must be for you, your daughter, and Noah! Has you grandson demonstrated any difficulties getting along with you or other family members? I ask because one of the cardinal symptoms of Autism is an extreme disconnect from others and difficulty negotiating social relationships. Individuals with Autism often appear to be &quot;in their own world&quot; and don't seek out touch and connection the way that so-called &quot;normal&quot; children typically do. In addition, children with Autism often flap their arms and have an intense interest in specific things (e.g., wheels of cars, lining up toys). These symptoms are generally apparent early on and parents notice that their child is different almost immediately. You have not mentioned any of these issues, so I am skeptical that your son has Autism. That said, the only way to know for sure is to continue to have him evaluated by his pediatrician.<br />
<br />
He does, however, appear to have a significant speech delay that is frustrating to both him and those around him. Depending upon which state you live in, many states provide services and early intervention for children who demonstrate severe developmental disabilities (and, yes, Autism is often one of the conditions that is treated). Thus, you should consider having your daughter reach out to her pediatrician to request additional information on developmental disabilities services. Similarly, you can write your state and county here, and I or another community member, will respond with some contact information.<br />
<br />
For more information on Autism, please see the following section of this site:<br />
http://www.education.com/reference/topic/SpecialNeeds_Autism/<br />
<br />
Good luck!<br />
> 60 days ago

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graham
graham writes:
Hi Mary.<br />
I'm not an expert in this area, but I have had many ear problems myself from a young age, and had many sets of tubes. When the ear drum is perforated things sound extremely weird. For me it was difficult to hear higher, speech like frequencies but lower frequencies were amplified. I would recommend that see a pediatric ear nose and throat specialist to make sure his ears are okay, and to conduct hearing tests.<br />
<br />
Please let us know how it goes.<br />
-graham<br />
> 60 days ago

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ilovechefwilliam
ilovechefwi... , Teacher, Caregiver writes:
Noah sounds like a great kid!  Because of his age you might be able to take him to an early childhood center in your area and get him tested.  If they can't test they can at least send you in the right direction.  Noah also sounds like he interacts.  I don't know about autism, but maybe apraxia?  Good luck!  It sounds like you are already on the right track to get him the best help that is available.
> 60 days ago

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dorian1
dorian1 writes:
Hello my son D'Ryan was having similar problems .... as an infant he had multiple ear infections due to his bronchitis after awhile it developed into asthma. He babbled alot the first two yrs of his life.HIs tubes were placed at age two. After that I went through the state to help with speech and they were very extensive but very patient with him. D'Ryan is now 5. He is in kindergarden. His speech is still not on level but it has improved immensely. I forgot to mention that he did not start talking until he was 3. It is a process but it will get better.
> 60 days ago

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crystalw143
crystalw143 writes:
My son is 5yrs old and has been diagnosed with apraxia first then dyspraxia. He does not talk at all, just sounds out the letters 'P, M, T." I do not know why they said its dyspraxia, sounds more like apraxia to me. It's only the speech we have problems with. Sounds like your grandson too could be a little bit of dyspraxia too. I'm aware that apraxia is like speech and it interrupts the messages to the brain to get from out the mouth. You said your grandson can at least speak somewhat but it's just hard for him and it gets all jumbled up. With my son it's like he knows what he wants to say but he just can't process it enough for him to let it out his mouth. He though doesn't get frustrated as I would think one would. I hope everything works out for your family! Good luck.
> 60 days ago

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