Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
jacquelinea
jacquelinea asks:
Q:

Does anyone else feel like the school is not responding appropriately to your child's ADHD diagnosis?

I have a 3rd grader who has been diagnosed with ADHD, I feel the school is not responding appropiately, even though my son is in IEP already. Does anyone feel the same way?
In Topics: Working with my child's teacher(s), ADHD & attention issues
> 60 days ago

|
marisa46
marisa46 writes:
HI,  My 6 year old son was diagnosed with ADHD this year.  He is in 1st grade in a CTT program with an IEP.  What do you mean the school is not responding appropiately?  Is your child having problems in school?
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
1
no
Cathey
Cathey writes:
You are not the only one. I have not one, but two children with learning issues. My youngest was diagnosed with ADHD and generized anxiety disorder. The school dragged their feet after they got the paper work that I provided to them to start a 504. After asking for help for 3 years, they did nothing except want to put her in oppertunity room (ISS for little kids) or  kick her out of school. They do not even have teachers or staff that are trained to deal with children with any special needs. They just throw them in with the rest and hope that they swim.  Same with my older child they do not provide any type of help for my older child, that is Autistic that has a IEP. They will not even provide the things on the IEP that is required by the state. GA schools are redickulous.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
mace-6149
mace-6149 writes:
I have the same problems with my sons school, its been 3 years in the same school they REFUSE to give him an IEP or a 504 and now he is suffering he may not make it out of the 4th grade. I am so sick of this we are moving to another school district hoping to get better results.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Loddie1
Loddie1 , Parent writes:
I know this may not be the answer you are looking for. But I have a lot of homeschool moms who actually find that this option works best and is less stress. I am a homeschool advocate myself and homeschool. You may want to look into this option if you can't get anywhere with the schools. Good luck :)
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
0
no
dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
Hi, Following up on the previous suggestion...

If homeschooling is an option you're interested in pursuing, here are some related resources on Education.com:

http://www.education.com/topic/homeschool-overview/

Another option to consider: http://www.k12.com/

I'm also including below a link to Education.com's special edition on learning disabilities, as well as The Parent's Guide to Third Grade.

I hope these resources are helpful to you.

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
icare
icare writes:
I am a special ed teacher and a mom with special needs kids.  I know different states have different rules and regs, so my advice may not be right on for your state.  What I do know is that as a parent you have a right to request that your child be evaluated for a disability.  The district does have the right to say no.  At this point in time they must give you a document that in my state is called a NOREP.  IT states that you requested that they test your child for a given disability, gives the reasons and documents you gave the school for wanting the tests and gives their reasons for saying no.  On the signature page there should be a place for you to check and say that you do not agree with their decision and want to have the districts decision reviewed by legal counsel.  You can choose to hire an attorney or an advocate.  An advocate would be a lot cheaper.  But the district has to pay the attorney fees if you win.    

For parents whose children already have an IEP, you should immediately demand a new IEP meeting.  I would suggest you get an advocate to go with you.  They are very familiar with the laws in your state and can help you be sure you get the best for your child.  There may be a small fee, but once you learn the ropes yourself, you can advocate for your child yourself.

An IEP is a legal document.  They have to be upheld.  IF you have proof that they are not being followed or upheld, you can sue the district and they know that.  A parent with knowledge of their rights is a dangerous thing to a district or a teacher who doesn't follow the state laws.  A 504 Plan is attached to the Americans with Disabilities Act and gives the parent more legal power, but their child is not going to be in special education classes.

Hope this helps
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
SimonWilkes
SimonWilkes writes:
Hey! If there is no support from the school there is a programe that has a forum set up for these problems on the PowerStudying Formula. All these problems are addressed. Developer is an ADHD person himself from the world memory champs.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Jobaby
Jobaby writes:
yes my son went into the school system with an iep and still does not know his alphabet or to read even though i have spent large amounts of money on learning tools
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
tdfm
tdfm writes:
yes, the teachers give a lot of homework for a 4th grader, even though he is 10 yrs old, but not mature. He can do some of the work some of the time but it takes so much longer than a normal child. his medicine wears off even though there is more medicine that can be given but it keeps him from eating and he doesn't get the amount of sleep he needs because of staying up to finish homework. The teacher doesn't understand or doesn't care that he can't understand or remember everything that goes in class.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
emerald16
emerald16 writes:
Along with the IEP does he have a behavior plan(BIP)? Seated close to the teacher. How many disruptions are allowed before he is reminded. Does he need some visual clues to help him get on track. Is he given tasks that would allow him to move around the room more with a purpose to lower the number of disruptions? What about a sticker chart to help him see how well he is doing. Would a healthy snack help. With a behavior plan certains items would need to be done before he would get into trouble which then makes him feel better about himself. ADHD children can start to feel like nothing they do is right. Research 504 and BIP (behavior intervention plan).
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Answer this question