Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
psicorienta
psicorienta asks:
Q:

Where can I find methods and/or techniques that abilitate hearing impared children to adapt?

In Topics: Hearing loss and hearing disorders
> 60 days ago

|

Expert

LouiseSattler
Mar 15, 2011
Subscribe to Expert

What the Expert Says:

Hello and thank you for asking about resources for helping a hearing impaired child.  Usually the JustAsk Expert writers would answer a question and then add websites at the end.  However, for your specific question I will sprinkle websites throughout my response.

First, I commend you for wishing to learn about assisting the hearing impaired.  You may wish to learn in order to understand about different degrees of hearing impairment.  I suggest you read about this on the Association for Speech and Hearing (ASHA) website.  (http://www.ASHA.org)  Included in their website is information and useful explanations regarding hearing loss.  Some photos are included that may help to explain a hearing loss to a child.

Second, learn about how a child with a hearing impairment can be helped through assistive hearing technology such as hearing aids and FM systems (to name a few).  Harris Communications is an excellent resource for products and information about technology, learning about hearing loss, teaching the hearing impaired, learning to sign (at any age) and games that help learning for a deaf child.  Their website is http://www.HarrisComm.com

American Sign Language (ASL) and Pidgin Sign English (PSE) are the two forms of sign language MOST commonly used in the United States.   There also is Signing Exact English (SEE), however, SEE typically is found as a mode of communication within the school systems.  Furthermore, Cued speech is a method of facilitating speech and not a form of a formal language.

Not all hearing impaired children use sign language, however if you wish to learn sign language you can access from libraries, bookstores, or online various DVDs, dictionaries or training videos.  As the owner of Signing Families I know that it is important that no matter how your child learns to communicate it should be supported by family members and the school.  If English is not your first language, there are videos that are in other language and incorporated with English and Sign Language.  Ask the child's teacher, to help you. Companies that may help you to learn sign language are numerous and a simple use of a computer internet search engine will be helpful.  

Lastly, be sure that the hearing impaired child (including an infant up to age 21) receives some kind of services from the school district.  This may be as simple as monitoring school progress informally to receiving education in a deaf school. A child with a cochlear implant, for example, may need extensive speech therapy, including what is provided via the school district.  To contact your school for starting the process for support services simply call your home school or the district office.

Please know that the former president of Gallaudet University, I. King Jordan, is known for a wonderful saying refering to the deaf population.  He stated... "Deaf people can do anything BUT hear!"

Good luck!

** NOTE UPDATED INFO ON WEBSITE LISTED**

Louise Masin Sattler, NCSP
Nationally Certified School Psychologist
Owner of Signing Families
http://www.SigningFamilies.com
Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no

Expert

LouiseSattler
Mar 15, 2011
Subscribe to Expert

What the Expert Says:

Hello and thank you for asking about resources for helping a hearing impaired child.  Usually the JustAsk Expert writers would answer a question and then add websites at the end.  However, for your specific question I will sprinkle websites throughout my response.

First, I commend you for wishing to learn about assisting the hearing impaired.  You may wish to learn in order to understand about different degrees of hearing impairment.  I suggest you read about this on the Association for Speech and Hearing (ASHA) website.  (http://www.ASHA.org)  Included in their website is information and useful explanations regarding hearing loss.  Some photos are included that may help to explain a hearing loss to a child.

Second, learn about how a child with a hearing impairment can be helped through assistive hearing technology such as hearing aids and FM systems (to name a few).  Harris Communications is an excellent resource for products and information about technology, learning about hearing loss, teaching the hearing impaired, learning to sign (at any age) and games that help learning for a deaf child.  Their website is http://www.HarrisComm.com

American Sign Language (ASL) and Pidgin Sign English (PSE) are the two forms of sign language MOST commonly used in the United States.   There also is Signing Exact English (SEE), however, SEE typically is found as a mode of communication within the school systems.  Furthermore, Cued speech is a method of facilitating speech and not a form of a formal language.

Not all hearing impaired children use sign language, however if you wish to learn sign language you can access from libraries, bookstores, or online various DVDs, dictionaries or training videos.  As the owner of Signing Families I know that it is important that no matter how your child learns to communicate it should be supported by family members and the school.  If English is not your first language, there are videos that are in other language and incorporated with English and Sign Language.  Ask the child's teacher, to help you. Companies that may help you to learn sign language are numerous and a simple use of a computer internet search engine will be helpful.  

Lastly, be sure that the hearing impaired child (including an infant up to age 21) receives some kind of services from the school district.  This may be as simple as monitoring school progress informally to receiving education in a deaf school. A child with a cochlear implant, for example, may need extensive speech therapy, including what is provided via the school district.  To contact your school for starting the process for support services simply call your home school or the district office.

Please know that the former president of Gallaudet University, I. King Jordan, is known for a wonderful saying refering to the deaf population.  He stated... "Deaf people can do anything BUT hear!"

Good luck!

** NOTE UPDATED INFO ON WEBSITE LISTED**

Louise Masin Sattler, NCSP
Nationally Certified School Psychologist
Owner of Signing Families
http://www.SigningFamilies.com
Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no

Additional Answers (1)

LouiseSattler
LouiseSattler , Child Professional writes:
Hello and thank you for asking about resources for helping a hearing impaired child.  Usually the JustAsk Expert writers would answer a question and then add websites at the end.  However, for your specific question I will sprinkle websites throughout my response.

First, I commend you for wishing to learn about assisting the hearing impaired.  You may wish to learn in order to understand about different degrees of hearing impairment.  I suggest you read about this on the Association for Speech and Hearing (ASHA) website.  (http://www.ASHA.org)  Included in their website is information and useful explanations regarding hearing loss.  Some photos are included that may help to explain a hearing loss to a child.

Second, learn about how a child with a hearing impairment can be helped through assistive hearing technology such as hearing aids and FM systems (to name a few).  Harris Communications is an excellent resource for products and information about technology, learning about hearing loss, teaching the hearing impaired, learning to sign (at any age) and games that help learning for a deaf child.  Their website is http://www.HarrisComm.com

American Sign Language (ASL) and Pidgin Sign English (PSE) are the two forms of sign language MOST commonly used in the United States.   There also is Signing Exact English (SEE), however, SEE typically is found as a mode of communication within the school systems.  Furthermore, Cued speech is a method of facilitating speech and not a form of a formal language.

Not all hearing impaired children use sign language, however if you wish to learn sign language you can access from libraries, bookstores, or online various DVDs, dictionaries or training videos.  As the owner of Signing Families I know that it is important that no matter how your child learns to communicate it should be supported by family members and the school.  If English is not your first language, there are videos that are in other language and incorporated with English and Sign Language.  Ask the child's teacher, to help you. Companies that may help you to learn sign language are numerous and a simple use of a computer internet search engine will be helpful.  

Lastly, be sure that the hearing impaired child (including an infant up to age 21) receives some kind of services from the school district.  This may be as simple as monitoring school progress informally to receiving education in a deaf school. A child with a cochlear implant, for example, may need extensive speech therapy, including what is provided via the school district.  To contact your school for starting the process for support services simply call your home school or the district office.

Please know that the former president of Gallaudet University, I. King Jordan, is known for a wonderful saying refering to the deaf population.  He stated... "Deaf people can do anything BUT hear!"

Good luck!

** NOTE UPDATED INFO ON WEBSITE LISTED**

Louise Masin Sattler, NCSP
Nationally Certified School Psychologist
Owner of Signing Families
http://www.SigningFamilies.com

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Answer this question