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acesand8s
acesand8s asks:
Q:

Is my first grade son gifted?

My son is 6 1/2 and will enter first grade in the fall.  He is reading at a fourth grade level and doing math at a second grade level. By no means do I think he should skip a grade -- I think he is emotionally and athletically appropriate to stay in first grade, and he relates terrifically with his peers.  But I am wondering if I should be seeking more from either the school or outside sources to supplement his academic capabilities.  Would you classify him as gifted, or is this not enough information?  Should I get him evaluated, and if so, how would I go about that?  I welcome your comments.  Thank you!
In Topics: School and Academics, My gifted child
> 60 days ago

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Expert

BarbK
Jul 19, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

I agree with Salfam's response below.  When school starts up, set up a conference with your son's first grade teacher and/or contact the ESE specialist.  Someone will most likely do a grifted screening to see if further testing is appropriate.  You can also have him privately tested, but that can be costly.  

As the school year progresses keep an eye on your son's attention.  Gifted students can become bored.  They work better when they are with other gifted students.  

If you want to work with him outside of school, follow his interests whether it is music, art, writing, math etc.  Make it fun.  This site does offer some excellent activities and additional information to help guide you when making decisions about your son's education.

Also, consult with other parents of gifted children both in and out of your son's school.  There are a number of parent support groups that also have valuable information.

Happy learning!
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Additional Answers (2)

salfam
salfam writes:
Congratulations on your high-achieving son! I have a son who excels academically as well. I would certainly check with the school district about testing and advanced placement opportunities. Since these aren't available in our district due to budget cuts, we supplement on our own with music programs, sports, and home activities, including many on this website :). In our case, my son wasn't challenged and was bored enough to have lost some of his interest in school, which is very disheartening. Good luck keeping his little brain busy!
> 60 days ago

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Abircoti
Abircoti writes:
I had a daughter who was at the same level as your son when she was six.  But she was at a 4th grade level in math.  I had her privately tested since the school she was in was not interested in doing anything to meet her needs.  Unfortunately they refused to listen to the psychologist's, pediatrician's recommendations to have her tested for the possibility of skipping.  She was so bored she drove everyone crazy, and they saw it as a nuisance for them more then anything.  I eventually enrolled her in an online school that skipped her, and that worked wonders for her behavior, and attitude towards school.  She is now doing great in school, and is loved by all her teachers.  I guess my point is, you have to follow your instinct when it comes to your child's needs.  From my experience no one knows what is best for him more then you.  Now that she is 13 she started telling me stories about her misbehavior at school in first grade, and that it was mostly due to her boardom, and her frustration in doing work that was, in her opinion at the time, "useless" to her. Yet, my other daughter (now 9) is just as smart, but does not want to do the extra work, nor does she want to go to gifted for that matter,  she is getting the grades and is happy.  Talk to your son, and ask him what he wants, what would make him happy, and you will know what to do :)  They are much smarter then we think.  Good luck with everything.  I hope that helps.
> 60 days ago

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