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ASimon
ASimon asks:
Q:

What are your home's rules and limits when it comes to video games?

With education.com's special edition on video games and with the constant media attention regarding video game controversy, I would love to know the variety of approaches families' have taken to give their child individual responsibility and freedom while still establishing ground rules. What approach have you taken with your children, students, etc.?
In Topics: Children and video games
> 60 days ago

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CreativeRachna
CreativeRac... , Child Professional, Teacher writes:
Alex,

This is a great question and very pertinent in today's time of computer, and video games being common and a part of most children's lives.  I think your question can be answered in two parts.  Firstly, the limits set would probably relate to the child's age and status in school.  For example, if you have a 17 year old junior in high school who is an excellent student and able to balance both school, and excessive video game play, there probably wouldn't be any reason to limit his game playing for any other reason that you may want him to spend time with you.  On the other hand, if you have a 10 year old who is struggling academically and or socially, and loves excessive video game playing, you may want to set some guidelines such as, 1.  Video games AFTER homework, or 2.  Video games if and only if you maintain grades, and lastly, 3.  Video games after some exercise and or social interaction.

Every family and parenting style is different with focuses on different things.  Some families are against excessive television, which would then include video games.  I'm including some reference articles for your perusal.  

http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Video_Games_Cons/

The second article answers more of your question regarding limits
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Parents_Media/?page=2

http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Television_Family_2/

http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Healthy_Habits_TV/?cid=70.100

I hope this helps,
Best,
Rachna
> 60 days ago

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ZachH.
ZachH. writes:
Well with what parents that might feel that children who play violent video games or games like Call of Duty or Battlefield the usual war games. It will be good to make sure you tell your child(ren) to not treat people unfairly or to have them say anything mean to them. Because it's really not the parents' responsibility to watch over the child(ren) to make sure they are not rude. Yet it is always a problem to gamers these days who hear the parents' child(ren) saying things like [bad names: question edited by Education.com Community Team]. A usual thing to do is not to have them be by themselves but to have them in a room where people would usually cross by to see if they are not acting up to date. Also even though it a good thing for young children to just have fun and play games, parents usually do not notice that the meaning "M-For Mature" or "T- For Teens" means that if your child is not "mature" enough for just playing a game and having fun instead of yelling at older more mature players and talking at them and being a "jerk". And the thing is this just does not just happen to a few children it happens to a lot of them and I say this because I've been around those type of children. Also if your child is always in their room it is a good thing to have them not stay in there and not be sociable. Even though their usual response is "I AM being sociable...I am talking to someone who lives in `said area somewhere else'."

So as said do this to make sure your child(ren) are having fun while learning responsibly;

1.) Make sure they are in a room that has people walking by every few minutes.

2.) Make sure that they are "mature enough" to handle the game. (And do not just ask them, see if they are by noticing how they act.)

3.) Do not confine them to a room so they can just stay in their all day long.

4.) Do not let them take food to their room (even though you want them having responsibility, it is not always a good thing to give them all your trust).

5.) Have them work for their games and consoles or they will never learn how to gain what they want. (You can also do this for other things except: food, drinks, or any of the needed things to survive.)
> 60 days ago

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AntibullyingAdvocate
Antibullyin... writes:
I believe it depends on the age of the child. Overly violent and sexually explicit videos or games should be restricted. Teach and research about the effects of watching and playing these games. There are parental controls on computers and electronic devices to help safeguard. Also, research and teach about the health risks associated with hours of playing these games. Set limits and boundaries while encouraging your child to have input about what is appropriate and for how long to play. Seek out fun, educational and positive games. Be careful, some games seem innocent until it is actually played. Hope this helped.
> 60 days ago

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JamielaIsmail
JamielaIsmail , Teacher writes:
Because of the nature our society is going, the children are exposed to enough violence and sex.  It differs from family to family.  I am more for proactive family time - my children are allowed 45 minutes of video gaming for the day.  The rest of the time is school work, community service, religious readings, family time (catching up with each other's lives) and chores.  I do monitor what they play - no sex, no violence irrespective of age.
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