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Lollipops
Lollipops asks:
Q:

What to do about an immature kindergarten student?

I teach kindergarten (5 year olds) and I have a student who behaves like a 3 year old - runs around the room, yells, screams, hits, annoys others, doesn't follow directions, runs away if you approach her, etc.  It's really disruptive to the class.  What can I do?
In Topics: Back to school, Kindergarten readiness
> 60 days ago

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ashita21
ashita21 , Student writes:
talk to this student. a lot of times these kind of unexpected behaviors age wise, are caused by some problems, possibly emotional. so talk or use activities like drawing so that u can get some hint of where the problem lies. once u know where the problem lies, u can intervene.

it could also just be that he hasnt learned about the structure he has to follow in kindergarten. u need to teach it to him that he needs to sit in one place and listen to u, etc.

hope this helps...
> 60 days ago

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Relle
Relle , Student writes:
Talk to the student. It is very likey that somethings they have seen has made them become like this. But dont be hard on them , remeber they are still only kindergarteners.
> 60 days ago

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educator_with_a_heart
educator_wi... writes:
I teach kindergarten and I have a student that sounds JUST like yours! It is so easy to get frustrated and get into a "negative attention" rut where most of the interactions are frustrated re-directions that end in chaos. I have found a few things that work ( at least sometimes!):
1) Simplify directions and ask the student to repeat the directions back. I also have picture/icon directions: a picture of cut, glue, then color, posted on the white board so your student can see.
2) Catch that student doing the right thing and make a "big deal" about it so they know you want to see them making good choices.
3) Have a quiet place where the student can go to "get it together" before re-joining the class. My student spends time at his desk and then lets me know when he is ready to be with the class.
4) Give clear, consistent messages and avoid idle threats.
5) Talk daily with the parents with a daily feedback card/conversation. when kids know we are on a team with their parents, it can help to motivate positive behaviors.
6) Give jobs! My student who is disruptive is actually a good little messenger to the office. He has "tons" of energy and loves to get out of class to do something helpful.
Good luck! Sometimes there is more going on than meets the eye, so be sure to get some history on this little girl. She could have some learning issue that interferes with her processing.
> 60 days ago

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