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One4mom4All
One4mom4All asks:
Q:

Can low-income schools 'go green' too?

Seems that there's a lot of talk this year about schools 'going green'. Wondering if that's only rich and middle class schools that folks are talking about.

More than half of the student body at our daughter's school is low-income (qualified for federally-subsidized lunches). The school struggles to cover the most basic academic supplies, desperately needs a paint job (and building repairs), isn't well landscaped, and is in danger of losing its sports program due to lack of funding from the district and state. I doubt they have the finances, volunteers or free time to make the school 'green' or environmentally friendly.

But I think this is an important issue because it affects the children's health, and Americans do need to make our way of life more sustainable (and less harmful to the planet).

So, what can struggling low-income schools do to be green? Are there any academic benefits from going green? That might help convince the principal and teachers to get on board with any 'green' program.

Thanks for any ideas you have!
In Topics: Nature and outdoors, Green living
> 60 days ago

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rkaiulani
Apr 23, 2009
Level

Best Answer!

what's this?
from a fellow member
I think that low-income schools can definitely go green. Things like turning all the lights off at the end of the day and using less energy to heat and cool the school will save on energy bills, and it doesn't cost anything to request recycling containers from the city and enlist students to use them. I know that for struggling schools, finding the time and money to do even little things can be a big challenge, but perhaps even asking the school science teacher to have kids plant some flowers or trees during a botany lesson could be a way to start both literally and metaphorically "greening" the school.

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Additional Answers (3)

KatieUppman
KatieUppman writes:
Low-income schools can shop 'used' for their resources!  Sprout Classrooms is a great resource for library books, book sets, resource books, technology, hands-on learning resources, etc.  

There is no reason schools should have to buy new-catalogs are SO expensive.  The more we support this 'used' resource, the more they can offer in the future!
> 60 days ago

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dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
Here are some Education.com articles that offer suggestions you may find helpful...

"Greening" a High School:
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Greening_High_School/

Going Green Without Going Broke
http://www.education.com/magazine/article/Sustainable_Savings/

5 Ways to Green Up Your School
http://www.education.com/magazine/article/5_Ways_Green_Your_School/

I'm also including some other relevant links below. Thanks for asking!

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Bio-Techco
Bio-Techco writes:
Low income schools are no different than high income schools.  It's all about the cost of going green.  If the Schools divert the Organics (our natural resources) from landfill and recycle they save the cost of hauling and tipping and fuel surcharges.  We at Bio-Techco collect organic waste and recycle into compost which saves 30% of the costs.  Go to Bio-Techco.com.

Paul@bio-techco.com
> 60 days ago

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