Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
chartermrs
chartermrs asks:
Q:

How can we inspire our grandson to do betting in science?

A GRANDSON IS HAVING GREAT PROBLEMS IN HIS 6TH GRADE SCIENCE CLASS WITH A FEMALE TEACHER WHO APPEARS TO BE "DOWN"' ON HIM FOR SOME REASON. HE EXCELS IN READING/ COMPREHENSIVE AND OTHER AREAS. HIS PARENTS HAVE MET WITH HER AND SHE OFFERS NO SUGGESTIONS ON HOW TO GET HIM MOTIVATED. OUR GRANDSON THINKS HER PROJECTS HAVE LITTLE MERIT AND HIS PARENTS HAVE SEEN OTHER KID'S PROJECTS WHICH OVBIOULSY WERE DONE MOSTLY BY THE PARENTS AND NOT THE STUDENTS THEMSELVES. HOW CAN WE INSPIRE HIM?
I'D APPRECIATE ANY INPUT. THANKS--A LOVING GRANDPARENT
In Topics: Helping my child with science, My child's grandparent(s)
> 60 days ago

|
Edu-Katherine
Edu-Katherine writes:
Hi Carol,

In the meeting with your grandson's parents, did this teacher say why she is down on him?  If he feels her projects have little merit, is it at all possible he is letting her know this in front of the class and perhaps challenging her, which gets her upset? It's so hard to tell what's really happening.  I know that some schools do allow parents to meet with both the teacher and the principal so that there is a neutral party listening to both sides.  Have they done this?  How are his marks in this science class?

Edu-Katherine
Community Team
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
bob
bob , Parent writes:
This is related to a topic I have never figured out.  How much should I, as a parent, get involved in my kids' school projects?  It is true, you can really tell which projects were done more by the parent than the child.  But, left to their own devices, most kids won't do a science fair project (for example) or will drop Mentos into soda bottles ('a project of little merit')

I think one key factor is developing a sense of "project" in your children (or grandchildren).  When the only "project" that a child undertakes is mandated by the school, I can see how the child could lack the motivation to undertake it, since he has no real sense of what a "project" is.

When I was growing up, my father always had a few short, medium, and long-term project in the works.  Building out the basement into rooms, cutting new gardens in the yard, painting a picture, building custom holiday decorations, and so on.  This taught me a sense of "an undertaking" and gave me a role model for engaging in an activity that lasted more than the length of a sitcom.

So I'm not sure inspiration is what is needed.  Examples and shared accomplishment might be better.  You may already have many or all of the elements of what you need; reinforcing the lesson and increasing your grandson's participation can only help.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
bob
bob , Parent writes:
As I was finishing that last post, I realized one thing that I did and my friends did that seems to be missing with my kids and their friends: model building.  Airplane models, car models, ship models.  This grew into model rockets and gas-powered airplanes.  I have to wonder, if you were to survey successful system builders (architecture, software, organizations, etc) today, if you would find a common thread of model building as a child.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
genermcmillan
genermcmillan writes:
Please give the ideal book details for good readings..:)
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Answer this question
Anonymous
Welcome!
Please sign in.
Not a Member? Join now!