Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
Black Friday sale on now! Save 50% on PLUS and Brainzy with coupon BLACKFRI. Learn More
Cath1
Cath1 asks:
Q:

i am a kindergarten teacher in a catholic school.  I have 2 students in my room who show no reaction to any kind of discipline.  what do you do then?

In Topics: Discipline and behavior challenges
> 60 days ago

|

Expert

Boys Town National Hotline
Jan 31, 2012
Subscribe to Expert

What the Expert Says:

Managing students and their behavior can seem very difficult and even scary for many teachers, especially to newer teachers. However, it is one of the main tasks teachers have in order to maintain an academic classroom environment. Kindergarten students can be some of the most difficult because for many of them, this is the first time they have been in a school like setting.  Preschool may not have been as structured so this is a little different for them.  

Most teachers have peers and heads of schools they can turn to for advice and tips to use that have been helpful to them. If you feel you have exhausted your measures it is time to have a meeting with the parents to see what kind of discipline can be done at home and at school to prevent this negative behavior.  Make sure you have the support of your principal to back up any questions that the parents may have.  Even having the principal involved in the meeting will be beneficial to everyone involved.  Follow up with parents after the meeting to make sure all of the questions have been answered to follow through with the discipline plan you have come up with.

If the child's behavior does not improve it may be suggested that the parent talk with their pediatrician about this behavior.  There could be some physical issues that are happening that only a doctor can diagnose.

We hope this is helpful.  Make sure you keep communication open with your principal on any contact with those parents in case any questions ever arise.

Good luck,
Boys Town Hotline
1-800-448-3000

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
0
no

Additional Answers (3)

Deanie1
Deanie1 writes:
1. Talk with a more experienced teacher to get new ideas to try.
2. Invite a more experienced teacher to observe the child in action and make suggestions.
3.  Focus on one or two things at a time...Say, "I need you to ...stay in your area..(sit on your chair, raise your hand,  )  "need" shifts the conversation.  
3. Make a list of "observable behaviors" (like you are a witness in court) and schedule a meeting with the parents. You may wish to have another teacher who deals with the child sit in on the conference. Ask them what they do when the child doesn't follow directions at home.   They may not be in control of this child and you may have to proceed on your own. Try to get them to participate in "helping your child improve her behavior".
 4. Try to greet this child at the door each morning and say something positive...  Comment on an article of clothing or notice a haircut, different pair of shoes, etc.  "Catch" this child being good.  Give positive verbal reinforcement whenever you can.   Praise in public, discipline in private.   try not to do it in front of the class.
5. Have the child earn a reward.   A behavior chart may be needed...Every 45 minutes or so go over to the child and her chart to give  the smiley face for doing the 1 or 2 things she needs to do (see #2).  "You  stayed in your area..You earned a smiley face." Or "You got out of your area.  You did not earn a smiley face.  You will have another chance during _____(next time frame)" ..find out what she likes...could be lunch with you, extra computer time, special art, etc.   X number of Smiley faces on a behavior chart earns the reward.  Don't require a perfect day...   She may need 3 out of 5 smiley faces in one day to earn the reward.   As a kinder child, she needs frequent rewards.
5. Let the principal know that you are being pro-active about this situation and that you are willing to learn new techniques.  Keep her posted.  Get her on your side as part of the problem solving team for this child.  The last thing you want is for her to find out from another parent.
6. No one is perfect.  Try to view this as a learning situation. I know that you are doing your best.  
7. Give yourself some treat..special food, relaxing bath, massage, etc.  You deserve to feel special.  
8. Be sure to eat well and take vitamins.  A child like this can wear you down.  Get to bed on time.
9.  Hang in there, Tiger!
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
1
yes
0
no
MysteryPerson
MysteryPerson writes:
first move them to a table in the back of the class so they will not  
bother other students.then if you see them fooling around you should
make them go up in front of the class and make them answer a question and if they still  don't  pay attention call a meeting with their parents and talk to them if they don't improve after that  take recess
away from them and keep them in class to do work
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
1
no
littleredboat
littleredboat writes:
1. Let them spend every break time and lunch time in the classroom.
Show them the other kids outside playing and then explain why there are inside. Then let them know if they want to go outside there they will have to listen.

They should also be standing at the back of the class when they do not listen during in class times.

As the behavior improves take away the punishments one at a time so that they know you are serious. Eg - keep back break time but keep the lunch time and standing.

Now if their behavior does not improve after 2weeks. Speak with the parents.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Answer this question