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education.c... asks:
Q:

Learning dissability or slow bloomer?

Hello,
my 5 year old is having a REALLY hard time learning u, n, v, w, b, and d. She also had a really hard time learning her numbers, but now has them down and does well in math. Her teacher is recommending that she repeat kindergarten because she is not ready. She has several signs of dyslexia, but her teacher insists that she doesn't have it. I understand that mixing up letters and writing letters and numbers backwards is common, but why can't she memorize these letters? Are these all common letters to mix up for children? Could it really be because she is not ready to learn?
In Topics: School and Academics
> 60 days ago

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Expert

BMelton
Sep 11, 2013
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What the Expert Says:

You are concerned about your daughter's learning problems at age 5. You can request that a qualified person assess whether your child has dyslexia or a similar sight problem that may be remedied. You state that your child has several signs of dyslexia. This is worth investigation. It's much better to intervene early than to see your daughter's frustration grow as she struggles with reading and math. Children learn at different rates, but retention in any grade needs to be explored. How will the teacher help your child by repeating a grade? Are these interventions available in the next grade? Research shows that retention is a negative experience for children.

There are interventions that may be helpful to her learning. For instance, a grey transparency or colored paper is used to help the child to view the letters and numbers on a page. Without the transparency (or colored paper) the numbers and letters float on the white paper.


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Additional Answers (2)

education.commember
education.c... writes:
Thank you for your advice. We went ahead and sent her on to first grade and she is doing great! She has such an amazing teacher now. I think the combination of maturing a little bit more over the summer and having such an amazing teacher has been the key. She is still mixing up b and d, but that is all. It is very fast paced i first grade and so far she has all A's and is keeping up just fine. I hope this helps other parents who are in a similar situation.
> 60 days ago

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TeacherandParent
TeacherandP... writes:
Those are common letters to mix up. Nature did not intend us to all be the same and learn everything at the same moment.  Some children walk at nine months and others don't walk till 14 months. Why? We're individuals. The child who walks at 9 months does not go on to be a better walker or better runner than the child who walks at 14 months.

That said it's not really possible in Kindergarten to know if a child is dyslexic or not - jeep an eye on things. Read aloud to your daughter every day - it builds a child's reading skills to be read to.

I'd also say there's nothing wrong with a child repeating Kindergarten. It can't hurt.
> 60 days ago

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