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frostyfreeze
frostyfreeze asks:
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have anything on making bird houses for our school " Brain Day" multi-level students

We are having a school wide Brain Day in May. I will have 30 students from Kdg. to 5th grade for 40 minutes each 3 sessions. I want to make a good size bird house. We did bird feeders last year. I have to start getting my supplies now. Please advise. Thank you..
In Topics: Learning issues and special needs
> 60 days ago

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Danielle
Danielle , Parent writes:
http://www.education.com/activity/articlehttp://wwww.education.comwww
This is a big range in terms of age and ability, which makes choosing one project difficult. For kindergarteners and first graders, the most simple bird house is one made from a recycled milk carton-- an old standby, but for good reason, as it requires almost no tools and very few supplies. Students basically cut a hole, punch in a perch, decorate, and hang.  More information is included here:
www.education.com/activity/article/Bird_Crafts/

Another option is one step above the pine cone and peanut butter feeder you probably made last year. Also good for young kids, this birdhouse is made from popsicle sticks:

www.education.com/activity/article/Popsicle_Bird_House_kindergarten/

For older children, have you considered a hummingbird feeder? The problem with birdhouses that are not made of cartons and such is that they require the use of power tools, or at the very least, hand tools. (Such as this one from Lowes, which includes directions and supplies:
http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=howTo&p=Build/BrdHouse) A hummingbird feeder is interesting and usually not something kids do as often as the pine cone version. Here's a link:

http://www.education.com/activity/article/Hummingbird_Feeder/

Okay, perhaps too much information, but wanted to let you know about two other fantastic resources outside of Education.com. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has some great brochures on birdwatching and attracting birds that can be downloaded easily from the internet: http://library.fws.gov/Bird_Publications/house.html

And last, once your kids have built their birdhouses, they will want to know which birds are visiting! The National Birdfeeding Society has a nifty tool that lets kids (or adults!) narrow things down by observing and doing some simple detective work, so they can recognize if they've got bluebirds, swallows, or any of hundreds of other kinds of bird visiting their birdhouse:
http://whatbird.wildbird.com/mwg/186/0/0/12/vals.aspx#Values
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dysha
dysha writes:
get wood
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