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sanjadee
sanjadee asks:
Q:

what are the example of the metacognitve activities?

what are the example of the metacognitive activities?
In Topics: Learning a second language
> 60 days ago

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greenprof2
greenprof2 writes:
Hi -
that is a good question! Metacognitive simply means thinking about thinking. As a retired teacher educator, I encouraged my students who were prospective teachers to ask metacognitive questions. There are many of these. For example, after a student answers a question or makes a statement, the teacher might say, "Why do you think that?" or, "Is that the only possibility?" or, What evidence do you have for that?" or, "Do you have an example?"  Such questions require more thinking about the answer and it is as a result of thinking that learning occurs.

You can try the same metacognitive questioning strategies at home too.

Michael Bentley, Expert Panel Member
> 60 days ago

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mayfieldga
mayfieldga , Teacher writes:
For me metacognitive would be thinking about how to think. I see the mind as a wonderful computer that can do many wonderful things.  I feel our individual environments do have great affect on our lives to often create more mental stress and improper pace and intensity in approaching mental work.

So for me I am thinking two metacognitive activities to help improve in those areas.

The first would be to try to see our minds as accumulating layers of mental frictions that hurt thinking, learning, and motivation to learn.  We could begin learning how to approach our lives more delicately to begin understanding how the elements our lives are coming together to create various mental frictions and learn how to understand, resolve and begin changing the way we approach our individual environments to begin more permanently reducing needless mental frictions in our lives.  This could offer a way to continually improve thinking, learning, motivation to learn and maintain better mental/emotional health.

Also we can begin learning how to more properly use the dynamics of approaching mental work such as academics more correctly by consciously slowing down and using more time to ponder/reflect on newer knowledge.  I feel in our day to day lives we hurt our proper dynamics of correctly slowing down for new mental work, so we end up trying too hard and hurting our learning and motivation process.  I feel our average stress may play a role in disrupting those proper dynamics by feeding that energy into our mental efforts.  I feel both tools are necessary for students to learn and achieve in higher academics today.

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worldquest
worldquest writes:
if a student answer your question you will ask him, why do you think thats the correct answer,or you can ask him some other question in relation to his answer.
> 60 days ago

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