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Anonymous
Anonymous asks:
Q:

Does the nation's childhood obesity prevention program include encouraging teacher and principal fitness?

I'm curious if the nationwide initiative to curb childhood obesity in the United States includes encouraging school principals and teachers to be fit too?

The principal at my daughter's elementary school is obese, and there are several teachers that are seriously overweight too. We expect parents and children to live more healthy lives to curb obesity in this country. I think we should also expect and enable their school-based role models to do the same.

Are there any incentive programs for teachers and school administrators to be healthy and fit? Do they even have wellness coverage in their health benefits? Does it vary by school district or state? Thanks for any info you have about this.
In Topics: School and Academics, Exercise and fitness, Nutrition
> 60 days ago

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Expert

mheyman
Jun 5, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

Michelle Obama's "Let's Move" campaign is moving ahead-- her web site has collected a large array of links and information that can help teachers, parents, school principals, and school districts improve both nutrition in the schools (meals, etc) and physical activity.  

Links, etc can be found at the index website:
http://www.letsmove.gov/activity/index.html
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billybeltz
Mar 24, 2010
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Best Answer!

what's this?
from a fellow member
Great question, couldn't agree with you more! As a physical Educator, it’s obvious when you attend conferences that many of our best and brightest are not exactly scoring 10’s in the role model department. It would be nice if NASPE would sponsor some type of recognition for physical educators who maintain healthy lifestyles (consistent training schedules, BMI”s within respectable limits, etc,)? Or maybe we should have to submit to testing like our students and achieve a certain fitness standard? Aren’t fire and police people required to stay in shape to do their jobs?

Anyways, SPARK (the company I work for) offer staff wellness programs designed to solve this very problem. "Health Promotion for Staff" is a component of the CDC's Coordinated School Health model, and although many schools attempt to implement a CSH program, they often overlook this area.

Serving as a role model for health and fitness is one of the most effective ways to help our students to become healthier, so hopefully this will become a part of the national conversation as the spolight continues to shine on childhood obesity.

If you'd like more information on SPARK's Staff Wellness program, visit http://www.sparkpe.org/coordinated-school-health/wellness-for-staff/

Cheers,

Billy
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Additional Answers (3)

Patrick08
Patrick08 writes:
I'm not sure of the answer, but I agree with you that it's not a good example for a teacher/principal to be obese when we're trying to get a nation of children healthier.  However, it's a lot easier to teach healthy habits to a child than it is to try and get an adult to change their ways.  It's not good for a child who looks at teachers/principals with respect as an authority figure to see them enjoying bad habits that you're trying to get them to avoid.  But really when does a child eat with their principal??  Teaching healthy habits will most definitely come from the parents who eat the same meals avoiding fast food and can actually spend downtime doing physical activities with them.  It would be hypocritical however for a school that bans a soda machine for students to allow one in the faculty room, and there should be some sort of check on this.
> 60 days ago

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dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
The U.S. Department of Education's Task Force on Childhood Obesity is asking the public for ideas to help solve the problem of childhood obesity. Here's more information about how to share your thoughts about incentives for teachers and principals: http://www2.ed.gov/news/pressreleases/2010/03/03172010b.html

Education.com also put together a special edition on preventing childhood obesity: http://www.education.com/special-edition/obesity/

Here's one article within that info center that is particular relevant...

Do As I Say, Not as I Do: 5 Ways Schools Make Students Less Healthy
http://www.education.com/reference/article/schools-make-students-less-healthy/
> 60 days ago

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MrsReading
MrsReading , Child Professional, Teacher, Parent writes:
Hi,

I worked at a school in Florida for a while and they did encourage wellness system wide. They had weight loss incentives, exercise groups, smoking cessation, etc. It was up to the individual however to avail themselves of these opportunities. Many, in fact most, did not.

Along the same lines as your thinking is the school uniform question. Should teachers be expected to wear uniforms and tuck their shirts in as students are required to?  

I guess the big question then, is should teachers be held to the same standard in these areas as their students? It will be interesting to hear others reply on this question!
> 60 days ago

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