Education.com
Try
Brainzy
Try
Plus
Nammy
Nammy asks:
Q:

Every nite my 5 yr old grandson goes to bed & says he's still hungry and wants to eat again. His teeth are brushed & he gets upset when I say no-help?

I don't know how to handle this "ritual". He had dinner and left the table saying he wasn't hungry, he plays then gets ready for bed ok, but as soon as I tuck him in he says he's hungry and wants to eat again.
Now, our pleasant "good-night" turns into something ugly, he cries and fusses and I feel like the bad guy... but I'm tired, I feel I've done all I want to do for the day, his teeth have been brushed and I am ready for some peace and quiet. How can I break this nightly scenerio?  Thanks
In Topics: Sleep and rest
> 60 days ago

|

Answers (1)

Batmom
Batmom writes:
You're not alone. My son has always been an after dinner snacker too. I was tired of fighting it all the time and then decided to give in, but under my rules! So after dinner he is allowed "dessert", which I don't mind if it's a cookie, brownie, icecream, fruit, etc. He has about an hour to let the sugar rush through him before bathtime. So right before bath I give him a small bedtime snack (my choice), soft pretzel, crackers, string cheese, or apples & peanut butter. Then he knows after bath there is no more snacking and his teeth are brushed. If he does not have snack before bath and asks for it later, then that's my fault for not keeping a routine he has begun to know and expect, I will get the snack...re-brush the teeth, and remember to myself to give snacks early tomorrow night. I also notice when given some carbs before bed he falls asleep faster, and stays sleeping longer through the night. Everyone's body is different and I'm respecting his need for a little extra to get through the night. However, obesity is not a problem for my son, if it were...then I would use Plan B.
> 60 days ago

Did you find this answer useful?
0
yes
0
no
Answer this question