maksrah
maksrah asks:
Q:

WHAT IS A PARAPHRASE

ON SCIENCE PROJECT
In Topics: Back to school
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Allyn Anderson
Dec 31, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

Paraphrase is the simple restatement in your own words of another's ideas or observations. To avoid plagiarism, it is important to give credit to the original source.

Often when paraphrasing, you will write a statement in your own words that is about the same length or perhaps longer than the original passage.

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Additional Answers (6)

mleano8
mleano8 , Student writes:
Paraphrasing in terms of Science usually means taking the findings of your research and summarizing it in your own words.

For instance, let's say you were doing a Science Project and did some research about it on the Internet and found 10 pages worth of answers. Paraphrasing would be summarizing those 10 pages of research into a shorter, more condensed answer. I'm sure you don't want to spend all night writing a novel about your Science Project so paraphrasing will be key.

Some quick advice though about paraphrasing: Be careful not to plagiarize. Plagiarism is defined as stealing someone else's words and passing it off as your own without crediting them.

I listed a couple articles to help you out on how to paraphrase without plagiarizing.

Good Luck and if you need practice, try "paraphrasing" my answer into 2 short sentences....just kidding ;)

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jritchie
jritchie writes:
Hi there,

Thanks for your question. To paraphrase is to summarize something in your own words. For example you can paraphrase a story, by retelling a shortened version of it in your own words. Make sure to highlight the important points. Good luck!
> 60 days ago

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annaponce
annaponce writes:
Paraphrasing can be tricky. Paraphrasing is very beneficial assignment, but at the same time it’s a daunting task. You need to make sure that you don't copy the original author's style or wording, that's why it's far better to ask for professional <a href="http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/ask-an-expert/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=14788">advice</a>. Paraphrases should sound like you, using vocabulary and sentence structures that your reader would recognize as your work.

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john18967
john18967 writes:
The title says it all! This little gem (best for middle school teachers, good for intermediate grades) fully explains teaching these three vital skills. Most of the book focuses on summarizing and has lots of practical activities for educators. It is easy to read.
Summarizing. It's one of those skills we teachers tend to assume students know -- or at least SHOULD know. Wasn't it the responsibility of the teacher the year before us (or two or three or four years before us)? And yet, right up into high school, if you assign a simple summary, you might be surprised at how many students struggle with it -- and badly, too. But you don't even have to assign a straight summary to test the theory. The skill (or lack thereof) will surface in such assignments as book reviews, literary analysis papers, or expository pieces.

Here's the ugly truth, then: Summarizing seems simple, but is more complex than it seems; summarizing seems old-school, but is as necessary in the 21st century as ever; and summarizing seems boring, but is part and parcel of one of the latest trends in literacy -- determining importance (pass the sticky note). And just try teaching it. For many of us, the ability to summarize well appears to be almost feral. We haven't enjoyed a lot of success in breaking it into teachable parts.

Emily Kissner's SUMMARIZING, PARAPHRASING, AND RETELLING will end all of that. Through years of experience in her classroom, trial and error, and her own work looking at the research, Kissner has provided the theory, the practical ideas, and even the graphic organizers to help you teach children how to summarize, paraphrase, and retell. She also offers anecdotes from her own classroom, thus bringing up possible pitfalls and typical mistakes and habits that children may experience. For example, in the summary chapter, Kissner shows us how researchers have broken good summary-writing down into five categories: including important ideas, deleting trivia, deleting repeated ideas, collapsing lists, and choosing (or creating) a topic sentence
> 60 days ago

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vijay43
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> 60 days ago

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jacob567
jacob567 writes:
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> 60 days ago

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