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education.com asks:
Q:

Parents: do you pay your child for good grades?

When your child achieves good grades at school, do you reward her/him with cash, savings bonds, stock, or other financial pay-outs? If yes, how is your incentive system structured (e.g., do A's earn more than B's, etc.?).

Thanks for sharing!
In Topics: Chores, allowance, and money management, Motivation and achievement at school, Parenting / Our Family
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Dr.Susan
May 12, 2010
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What the Expert Says:

Kids who are rewarded for good grades--especially with any form of money--will quickly learn that all that has any value is money, and not much else. I think it is important to ask yourself if this is, in fact the message you want to communicate to your child.

By giving value only to the outcome (the grade achieved), and no value to the process by which the outcome was achieved you miss the very important opportunity to help your child learn how to learn and how to work hard--both critical life skills. By paying your child for grades you don't ever ask: did you work hard? Did you plan well? Did you work cooperatively with others? Are you reading a more challenging book (or in a more difficult class) that might make it harder to get an A, but is better use of brain power?

The message you give your child by paying for grades is that you care about the outcome and not the process by which the outcome is achieved. This is a slippery slope in the world of parenting because kids need to be valued for who they are, NOT for their achievements. In fact we can take this a step further, kids need to be valued by their parents for who they are on the inside,  not by what they 'look like' on the outside (grades, clothing, size/shape, popularity). In addition, it is difficult to quantify the value of a grade--one child may work very hard for a "B" and another in the same family may easily achieve an "A", so how would you monetarily reward these achievements...it can cause sibling rivalry, jealousy and resentment.

For all these reasons, I'd strongly caution you to steer away from motivating with money.
Good Wishes and Great Parenting,
Dr Susan Bartell
JustAsk Expert
www.drsusanbartell.com
Twitter @drsusanbartell
NEW book “The Top 50 Questions Kids Ask”

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Additional Answers (4)

ronald
ronald writes:
We raised two boys. We did not routinely reward them for all good grades. Nevertheless, we did provide incentives for grades only when we believed that for a given subject they could do better. Example, when my son received a B, and if I knew he did not try hard, I would give him an incentive to perform better.  Hence, we tried to target incentives designed to make improvements in subject where we knew he had an aptitude.
> 60 days ago

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fishyfashions
fishyfashions writes:
Yes.  Your child should know that hard work is being rewarded but only if he\she is working hard.  I know some kids who get good grades but do not work hard.  I guess they are naturally clever.   Base the amount of money on the amount of work they have done but don't spoil them.  Reward them with other ways as well.  Take them out or go see a movie.  Use your imagination.
> 60 days ago

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dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
Our daughter is in elementary school, and I appreciate all of the previous answers! We don't currently reward her with money for good rewards, but do heap plenty of praise on her for her accomplishments (including good grades).

I also came across this article on Education.com that others may also find relevant: http://www.education.com/reference/article/reward-children-good-report-cards/
> 60 days ago

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PAsoccermom
PAsoccermom writes:
I found everyones input to be very valuable. I liked hearing all the pros and cons of paying ones child for good grades. I do pay my daughter for hard work, and when she's working hard and earning good grades I pay her for that as well. I'm trying to emphasize that hard work pays off in many ways. Whether I'm doing that correctly or not has yet to be seen, but since implementing this plan she's doing much better in school and trying harder. She sets goals of what she wants to purchase and what she wants to save. So I think it's working well for us at this point.
> 60 days ago

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