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education.com asks:
Q:

I need some pointers on how to talk to a preschool teacher about her lesson plan.

"I am a Ed. Coordinator at a Headstart. I am in charge of two teachers. My 3-year olds' teacher has the perfect lesson plan. My 4-year olds' teacher, her lesson plan is very blah and no information. I need to get some pointers on how to talk to her about it. This my first year and she has been a teacher here for 10 years and was able to get by with it for this long."

Asked by Teresa after reading the article, "Mr. Teacher: I Love It When a Lesson Plan Comes Together":
http://www.education.com/magazine/column/entry/...
In Topics: Working with my child's teacher(s), Preschool
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Allyn Anderson
Oct 3, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

As the educational coordinator, what do you expect to see going on in the classrooms that you supervise? Once you've determined this, consider what elements you would need to see in your staff's lesson plans to ensure the kind of educational activities you want your program to represent. Written plans don't always show if a good educational program is in progress, but they are an essential step in determining what direction the class(es) is going. Consider developing a checklist or a lesson plan format for your teachers to routinely complete. Include such things as educational objectives, outcomes you expect to see from the children, how the teachers will assess the children's learning, activities to use, materials needed, and time to teach the lessons in order to achieved the expected outcomes.

Once patterns are set in adults, it will take time and patience to make significant changes. Training good, responsive teachers doesn't occur "overnight."

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Additional Answers (1)

ilovechefwilliam
ilovechefwi... , Teacher, Caregiver writes:
If you are wanting to see more in a lesson plan, then you need to state your expectations.  This needs to go for every teacher that you work with.  Not everyone has the same idea about lesson plans.  I know that in my classroom my lesson plans are very vague, due to the fact that I teach children with autism in a mostly self contained classroom.  I am overprepared though with activities to do throughout the day.  I am also very organized, so everyone that walks in my room knows where to find things.  I have a great principal who believes that if she wants to see what is going on in a classroom she doesn't need to look at the lesson plan, but actually observe the teacher.
> 60 days ago

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