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Need preschool or kindergarten projects for special education students

I work with special education students - need projects etc. on a preschool or kindergarten level - can you help? thanks

Asked by a member via email
In Topics: Special education
> 60 days ago

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Expert

LouiseSattler
Apr 15, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

Hello and thank you for writing to JustAsk,

There are many projects listed here on Education.com, however a few adaptations may need to be made for children with learning challenges.

Also, consider projects that use photographs as young children relate well to real pictures of items or people in their environment.  A fun project is to make a collage using photos of the child's family and school friends. Add a few words to help with reading development.

Keep in mind to have projects with immediate results versus ones that take a while, such as planting seeds.

Also, you may wish to check out this terrific website: Mommy on a ShoeString http://www.mommyonashoestring.com which shows inexpensive and fun child-centered projects

Good luck!

Louise Sattler
Nationally Certified School Psychologist
Owner of SigningFamilies.com
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Additional Answers (3)

CJA829
CJA829 writes:
There are a lot of hands-on and interesting activity ideas on the site, including a sensory table:
http://www.education.com/activity/article/speakaboo-sensory-table/

lots of good art, like this one that teaches the idea of symmetry
http://www.education.com/activity/article/symmetry-squish/

Check out more with the link below. Hope this gives you a start.

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lynellen
lynellen writes:
If you are looking for activities to enhance handwriting skills and understanding what each activity helps develop from a developmental standpoint you might try the book Alphabet Soup: Stirring Your Child's Interest in Letters. Here's some examples on writing letters without a pencil:
  Fish for letters using a homemade fishing pole with a magnet on it.  Pick up letters made on index cards with magnetic strip or paper clip on them.
   Mystery writing:  Have your child write a letter on another child’s back using his fingers.  Have the child guess the letter from what he felt on his back.
    Use sticky wicks purchased at a teacher’s supply to make letters on a vertical surface such as a wall or refrigerator.
  Write a letter on a clothespin, making a set of the alphabet.  You will need extra letters especially vowels for spelling words.  Clip the clothespins on a rope or the bottom of an easel or chalkboard to spell out words or your child’s name.
> 60 days ago

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