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Stephanie7
Stephanie7 asks:
Q:

Are private schools legally responsible to provide the same services as public schools for learning disabled kids?

My daughter was diagnosed with a visual processing disorder. She has a service plan (I'm working on making it more specific) and the school has said it is on board with dealing with her learning problem. Are private schools legally responsible to provide the same services as public schools for learning disabled kids?
In Topics: Learning disabilities, Visual processing disorder
> 60 days ago

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AmandaM
AmandaM writes:
The answer to this question is slightly tricky. Many (or most) private schools are not legally obligated to provide such services. If your child has been placed in a private school setting via the public school system's IEP process, then the onus of financial responsibility for providing Special Education services is on the public school system. If a child is placed in a private school by a parent, there is no such responsibility.

However, by law, public schools must also have a private schools service plan that provides some services to students with disabilities who attend private school. The funding, services and delivery of services are sometimes limited in scope, depending on the district in which your child would be attending school should s/he attend public school.

You mentioned that your child has a service plan. Is this an educational service plan (an IEP or IFSP)? If an educational service plan has been implemented, then the agency who worked with you to create the plan, typically the public school system, is obligated to provide the services outlined in the plan.
> 60 days ago

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Stephanie7
Stephanie7 writes:
The private school responded to my request that they test her, and the district school system paid for that - hence the Service Plan. I know that the district will provide some after school "services" - for which I'm bracing for a struggle as I'm not interested in their tutoring her, but rather giving her learning strategies. I'm very concerned about accommodations in school - other than extra time on tests. I have discovered that it's on me to try to convince them to allow her, for example, to receive note-taking assistance (either via a Pulse Pen which is my choice since it puts the responsibility on my daughter, or a note buddy - which is not a great choice since it's a small school and that could open the door for relentless nastiness on the part of classmates).
> 60 days ago

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Stephanie7
Stephanie7 writes:
This is a followup on my original posts. It was a fantastic year for my daughter. I think in retrospect, much of her learning angst had to do with transitioning into high school (and magnified for her having home schooled 6, 7 and 8th grades). Her tutor at school was the ESL teacher, and her shill set proved to be perfect in terms of what my daughter needed cognitively. She got a bit of extra chem help from a senior kid recommended by the head of the dept. at a local high level school, and that worked well too. Now if she'd only cut the snark factor she likes to use on me life would be decent! But that's part of being 15, and I'll just have to let it slide.
> 60 days ago

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