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Anonymous
Anonymous asks:
Q:

Are public schools required to allow  Autistic children  to remain in their school even if the child is a physical threat to the other children

This child has attacked numerous children and teachers, has destroyed property and uses profanity.  He has been removed from the classroom but still has caused numerous instances where the school has had to go on
"lock down" because he is in the hall screaming profanity and physically attacking anyone who is nearby.  My children as well as many other children are scared to go to school and parents are very upset because this enviroment is not conducive to learning.  We have been told by the administration that he is protected by the Disabilities Act and that unless he does serious physical harm to someone or brings a weapon to school that the situation will remain the same.  Although I am very sympathetic to this child and his family I am not willing to let my child be the one serious harm is done to.
In Topics: Special needs, Autism & Aspergers Syndrome, Discipline and behavior challenges
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Boys Town National Hotline
Mar 24, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

The first response to your question is correct in that every child is entitled to a free and appropriate education.  However, there is somewhat of a grey area as to the extent a school has to go to provide that.  I understand your concern for your childs physical safety.  The best thing you can do is discuss your concerns with the principal, superintendant, or school board.  It sounds like you have done that and have not gotten the response you're looking for.  I can only emphasize that you should continue to discuss things until you feel as if you've been heard and understood.  I'm sorry that you are feeling so frustrated by the circumstances and hope that your school district can come to a safe and appropriate solution for everyone.

Boys Town National Hotline
1-800-448-3000

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Additional Answers (9)

ilovechefwilliam
ilovechefwi... , Teacher, Caregiver writes:
I read your question and was very concerned by it.  Every child is allowed to have a free and appropriate education.  However, this sounds much like that not only are your childs needs not being met, but neither is the child that is causing the problems.  Some districts don't understand the Least Restrictive Environment.  You are put in a sticky situation though.  As a parent you can voice your concerns, but you can't know to much information on the child themself due to confidentiality rules.  I know that my answer didn't help much.  I know that in our school we had this same issue that started last year.  It finally was able to be somewhat resolved this year, because of all of the steps that schools have to go through to cover all of their bases.  Good luck!
> 60 days ago

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KaleighsMom
KaleighsMom writes:
The school is right. He is protected by the Disabilities Act. Autism is a very serious disability and most children do not know what they are doing when they are in that type of mode. This child is probably in a special needs classroom most of the time and those teachers and assistants are trained to handle all those types of situations. Some states also have specially trained behavior techs that come into the school to work with certain students to get their attitudes and behavior under control. Maybe you should ask if he has one of these behavior techs available to him. They work wonders for even the most uncontrolled children and teens. But remember he is autistic and most of his problems cannot be resolved. Autism is not cureable!!
> 60 days ago

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concernlearn
concernlearn writes:
I am probally not qualified to answer this ? But here is my answer. 1ST it cost the district more MONEY to send a child to a special school. 2nd the school has to have a special IEP and parents have to agree to send thier child. 3rd there has to be room in the school to place the child there. I have asked a similar question about when it is not approiate to send these children to public school and no one seems to have an answer. It seems to me this was not considered when the disabilities act was assembled. I work in a special ed classroom in a puplic school
and I fell that it is not fair to the child or the other students in the class to keep the child there. it is very hard to teach when you are assentially being used as a babysitter. The scool district has to think of how much it would cost if 15 other children failed to learn, or if a person was hurt because of there failur to prevent an accident. CAN ANYONE ANSWER THIS QUESTION HONESTLY??????
> 60 days ago

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momof594
momof594 writes:
first of all i am a mother of 3 autistic children and i would never allow my child to attend a school when he is not ready, see the difference is that autistic children have many behavioral issues that impede there learning and other childrens learning. that right there is the BIG SIGN THAT THE SCHOOL IS IGNORING! IT GETS ME VEY UPSET BECAUSE THAT CHILD SHOULD BE IN A INTENSIVE HOME BASED ABA PROGRAM TO HELP HIM DEAL WITH HIS ISSUES OR ATLEAST HAVE A BIP PLAN IMPLEMENTED IN HIS IEP(BEHAVIORAL INTERVENTION PLAN) TO DEAL WITH THESE KIND OF SITUATIONS, ALSO I WONDER WHERE HIS PARENTS ARE AND WHAT THEY ARE DOING TO HELP THERE CHILD, MY 3 YR OLD SON HAD BEHAVIORAL ISSUES SO I KEPT HIM HOME ON A HOME BASED ABA PROGRAM, HE IS NOW 5 AND IS READY FOR SCHOOL . this poor child is another sad story of how the school districts rob our children of the education they could have, if this child would be helped with BI OR WHO KNOWS WHAT KIND OF SENSORY ISSUES HE IS DEALING WITH BECAUSE NOBODY HAS OBVIOUSLY DONE THERE JOB IN FINDING OUT WHAT IS CAUSING HIS BEHAVIORS TO TARGET THEM AND ELIMINATE THEM, HE DESPERATLY NEEDS A FAA ASSESMENT TO SEE WHAT IS GOING ON WITH THIS CHILD, IF YOU EVER HAVE A CHANCE TO TALK TO THIS CHILDS PARENTS PLEASE TELL THEM TO ASK FOR AN ASSESMENT FOR THERE CHILD AND TO GO TO www.wrightslaw.com TO GET MORE INFO ON HOW TO HELP THERE CHILD AND ALSO YOUR CHILDREN BECAUSE IT IS AFFECTING EVERY CHILDS EDUCATION IN THAT SCHOOL.
> 60 days ago

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linda.theappletree
linda.theap... writes:
My son was in this category.  Unfortunately, his autism was so severe that he could not manage in a regular classroom setting.  Although I know it is controversial, he was in a self-contained room with a quiet room attached.  If he had been forced to endure all of the commotion of a regular class, he surely would have severely hurt himself.  (He was self-abusive rather than abusive to others.)
> 60 days ago

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LindaMcDonough
LindaMcDono... writes:
You have taken a good first step by talking about it within a respectable forum. The next steps you should consider are to learn a bit more about the general and specifics of this situation. Be careful when using a label, since sometimes we can get it wrong. Autistic children do not act like this. It seems to be a different label. But, what does it matter, what description we chose to use, he is a child. All children are entitled to free appropriate public education. Do a query search for that term and for laws about education. In specific terms, he has a right to privacy so you will not have access to know the whole story. Stick with the part about how another child's behavior influences yours or your children's. This is a great opportunity to role model a positive approach to what seems like a negative situation. Show your children how to be compassionate. Discuss with them how fortunate they are to have been born without a disorder. It is the luck of the draw, whether we are born as blondes or have brown eyes, or have autism or ODD. Then ask the Principal to listen to your concerns. Present them with the new research you have done, and he or she will know you are taking positive steps to solve a problem in collaboration. Good Luck, there is a lot to understand. Try to talk to the child's parents too. Imagine what they might be going through. Maybe they could collaborate with you; you help them understand your concerns and they can help you understand the disorder.
> 60 days ago

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L.Huddleston
L.Huddleston writes:
Please, take a little time and read about autism.  I can promise you that the lives of this family are so difficult, and they would not want be so misunderstood.  There are behavior modification methods the school could try, and the first would be to hire an assistant who's only job is to be that student's helper.  By law, each child is due an adequate and appropriate education, but it does not have to be at the expense of others.  Check your local state website, speak to the Director of Special Ed., be the squeaky wheel.  It isn't fair to your child OR the child born with this hateful disability.
> 60 days ago

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Sherry*36
Sherry*36 writes:
Yes. Im the parent of an ASD child with tourrets syndrom. These children have as much right to an education as "normal" children. With that being said the school is to have a saftey plan in place for situations like this. The child is supposed to be remove and take to a "safe" place for them to work threw their issue and be no harm to their self or others. The screaming of profanity cld be an underline condition but you have to remember no matter where you take your child when you allow them in "public" even school (my opion the worse place) they are gonna hear things you may not agree with. Unfortiunatly we dont live in a perfect world and this is part of nature god created. Also depending on the childs abilities and I.Q. their might be a special needs school in your area but again thats up to the parents if they wanna send their child.
> 60 days ago

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demicat78
demicat78 writes:
I am a mother of a child with autism.  We are also dealing with him being aggressive towards adults, specifically family members and teachers.  The one thing I keep running into is how little knowledge most schools have for dealing with situations like this, and how unwilling they are to look outside of their district, or even their own school for assistance and guidance.  My son has a right to an education, he is not severe enough for a special education setting and his behavioral and sensory issues make it very difficult for him to function in a general ed setting.  There seems to be no inbetween, or the school is not willing to try to find it.  Do any of you know what the inbetween is because I certianly do not.  I wish I did, I am sure my son does as well.  I am concerned because I am getting to a point where I am concerned that no teacher will be willing to educate my son.  The one thing I know, it is not my child's fault.  It isn't mine either.  Not every treatment works for all children, so to assume that it is a lack of parenting is insulting.  Is it my problem when my son can no longer go there?  Is it my responsibility to find someone to educate my son if the district is no longer willing too?  No, it isn't.  EVERY CHILD has the right to be educated, not every parent can drop everything and spend every minute of their time at home with their children, its unrealistic.  (I am a single mother, someone has to provide for my family).  Most parents of special education parents try to make themselves accessible to the schools and try to be as proactive as possible. I spoke to the school in August and forewarned them and tried to help them to be prepared, they only decided to do anything about it once my son was suspended.
> 60 days ago

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