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Loddie1
Loddie1 , Parent asks:
Q:

What recommendations would you have on a home schooled child with an I.Q. score between 145-155? How would you alter a regular curriculum?

How would you alter this curriculum to not over burden the child? Please be specific. I need some ideas.
In Topics: Homeschooling, Special needs
> 60 days ago

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Expert

RoxanneR
Aug 25, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

Children with IQ scores that vary considerably from other students can present challenges.   Obviously, it’s wonderful to have a child with such a high I.Q. and I’m sure you want to ensure that he/she is not bored with the regular curriculum.

There are various ways in which the curriculum can be altered, but ideally, you want to find the best way possible to appeal to the exceptional needs and interests of your child.

Have you explored whether or not your school board offers a program catering to such students?  Most school boards have programs in place for gifted and talented students.  Within these programs, there are various concessions made to accommodate each student’s unique attributes.  

Depending on the program, it may offer the opportunity for your child to explore his/her interests to a depth not permitted within the regular classroom.  Preferably, your child should have some sort of individual program plan in place.  The person who prepared said program will have taken many factors into consideration in order to develop a plan which can best address how best to alter the curriculum.  This program can then be used by the parent or classroom teacher, whether in a regular or gifted classroom setting, because it tells them how best to alter the curriculum for your child.

If you’re homeschooling, I would explore all of the various resources out there.  Speak to other education professionals, educational material professionals and parents who are homeschooling to find out which series are more challenging within the various subjects.  Usually, on various websites marketing homeschooling education materials, you can have a sample of what the book is like.  Knowing your child’s abilities and the direction in which you want to take them will help you determine which direction to take.  If you’re unsure, I’d consider requesting professional help, whether it is from your homeschooling board or from experienced teachers/tutors.  Obviously, no system is perfect, but it’s difficult to regain lost time and you don’t want to find that you’re always “experimenting” with what direction to take.  Your child’s future is at stake and you absolutely want to make sure you have all of the best resources available.

You’re also going to need to take possible social issues into consideration.  Not always, but sometimes gifted children have difficulty with social skills because their level of thinking or degree of maturity doesn’t correspond to that of their same aged peers.  In this respect, a special program can often help nurture the “differences” rather than making a child feel like their differences make them an outcast.

It’s sometimes the case with gifted children that academics become the primary focus.  Here is another area in which you must encourage balance.  Gifted or not, they still want to play and explore like other children so try and have your child join the soccer team, a dance club, etc.  Activity is still vital and having outside interests will create a greater sense of balance.  It will give your child an additional outlet for his/her energies and it also helps restore the realization that everyone is good at something.  Your child may excel academically, but face challenges out on the soccer field.  Those challenges will help him/her realize that we’re all special in our own way and we need to appreciate the talents of others as much as we recognize our own.

I wish you all the best in finding the best place for your child.  As I said before, having a gifted child is a blessing, but it does present some challenges.  With the right approach and exploration of available programs, you’ll be able to find something that works best for you and your child.
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Additional Answers (10)

Loddie1
Loddie1 , Parent writes:
Thanks for your insight. I need specific ideas though. I am familiar with talented and gifted programs in the schools. Does anyone have a gifted child and can tell me what you do specifically with him or her? For example: "We do this activities/activity for science in replacement of..." I need ideas to do with a ten-year-old that has 155 I.Q. We already have a special science lab program we attend that challenges her in this subject. However, I need ideas in other subjects. And yes, she is in soccer, scouts, karate, 4-H, and has plenty of time for play. So socialism is not an issue here rather academic challenges. The schools in my area do not offer the challenge she needs. We have surpassed them on that level. They do not even offer a simple science fair. We have to travel to a bigger city for that. I know it is sad, but that is whay we love homeschooling.
> 60 days ago

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Windy1
Windy1 , Child Professional, Parent writes:
I would suggest you find a local scientist in your community and arrange an intern/apprenticeship study. Best learning is usually hands-on anyways! Good luck.
> 60 days ago

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Loddie1
Loddie1 , Parent writes:
Unfortunately, I have not received a decent answer yet! Please help!
> 60 days ago

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ilovechefwilliam
ilovechefwi... , Teacher, Caregiver writes:
Have you looked into some online collaborative projects?  Jen Wagner does some really great ones that you can modify as needed.  Some museums and other things offer skype or ustreaming.  If you homeschool I would recommend trying to connect through technology.  You could also start a destination imagination team.

Good Luck!

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Loddie1
Loddie1 , Parent writes:
I think people are missing my question. I am needing ideas on how to alter a curriculum to fit the needs of a gifted student and examples. I am not sure how clearer I can get. Although I do appreciate the links, it is not the answer I am seeking. We are well aware of additional activities and challenges. Has anyone take a regular curriculum and revamped it? Please let me know what you did SPECIFICALLY ( examples). Thanks in advance :)
> 60 days ago

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Loddie1
Loddie1 , Parent writes:
NOTE: THE TOPIC IS IN HOMESCHOOLING! Please read before answering. I have received many responses in regards to a public/private school and we do not use the schools as stressed in the original question.
> 60 days ago

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MrsEby
MrsEby writes:
Hi Lobbie1- I read your questions and I have to tell you, I have a 12 soon to be 13 year old with a similar IQ and he is very hard to keep busy. I have found that if we as parents just let them explore their own minds and creativity they tend to want to do more. When we try to "find" them activities they seem to pull back some. Or at least with my son. I make sure he is always doing something productive but I do let him use his imagination and let him find things to use his brilliant brain on. I will recommend buying alot of brain power toys for home, my son loves the brain teaser you can get them at Barnes and Noble, also there are alot of books for the mind there if you look around.Teach signing that is very good for them.http://www.cut-the-knot.org/ is a great web-site for math teaching. Also http://mathworld.wolfram.com/ is a great site.
> 60 days ago

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clsunshine
clsunshine writes:
I think it would be helpful to know what curriculum you are using if you want to know how to modify it. Or are you seeking a new curriculum and are asking what curriculums other people are using and how they modify those curriculums?

It would also be helpful for others to offer you suggestions if we knew the age and grade level (both actual grade and the grade level your child is currently able to work at). If you are looking for more specific suggestions you need to provide more detail.

I would also suggest using a test like the Iowa CogAT (scoring most useful when looked at with the ITBS results) to find out what type of learning style is best for your child and what styles your child is more "weak" in learning. Then you can "work" on areas/styles that are not as strong with your child (This doesn't mean your child is below - an area that is not a strong one for your child may still be well above average). Everyone has areas they are not as strong in and those areas are of course more challenging. Helping your child to work better in these areas/styles will make it easier in the future (like in college) when he/she has professors that generally teach in their preferred style that happens to be your child’s weaker style. Working in this way you provide challenge now and skill that would be helpful later.

All in all, no 2 children will be the same. What works for one person you suggests a specific modification may not work at all for your child. The best part of homeschooling is you can tailor the learning to your child; you are struggling with what can often be one of the hardest aspects. Don't lose heart though, it is possible and well worth it!
> 60 days ago

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clsunshine
clsunshine writes:
I think it would be helpful to know what curriculum you are using if you want to know how to modify it. Or are you seeking a new curriculum and are asking what curriculums other people are using and how they modify those curriculums?

It would also be helpful for others to offer you suggestions if we knew the age and grade level (both actual grade and the grade level your child is currently able to work at). If you are looking for more specific suggestions you need to provide more detail.

I would also suggest using a test like the Iowa CogAT (scoring most useful when looked at with the ITBS results) to find out what type of learning style is best for your child and what styles your child is more "weak" in learning. Then you can "work" on areas/styles that are not as strong with your child (This doesn't mean your child is below - an area that is not a strong one for your child may still be well above average). Everyone has areas they are not as strong in and those areas are of course more challenging. Helping your child to work better in these areas/styles will make it easier in the future (like in college) when he/she has professors that generally teach in their preferred style that happens to be your child’s weaker style. Working in this way you provide challenge now and skill that would be helpful later.

All in all, no 2 children will be the same. What works for one person you suggests a specific modification may not work at all for your child. The best part of homeschooling is you can tailor the learning to your child; you are struggling with what can often be one of the hardest aspects. Don't lose heart though, it is possible and well worth it!
> 60 days ago

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polarbearplay
polarbearplay writes:
I have a brilliant 10 year old as well. Likes science. I unfortunately am a science teacher and I don't use a curriculum with him. He is allowed to roam the internet on the topics we cover. The rules are that it has to be a valid site. dot govs or dot edu. I usually use textbooks that are middle or high school. I even let him use college texts. Assessment is the hardest part. What does he really know? I have used a simple art journal for him to record what he has learned in some way. I try to encourage him to enter in various ways, graphs, art, paragraphs, experiments. I can't say that he likes the grind of documenting his findings but we talk about how it is necessary for good science. I have also used many montesorri materials for other areas such as math and grammar because montesorri goes deep.
> 60 days ago

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