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kripp5911
kripp5911 asks:
Q:

does salt water make electricity?

for science fair project. need to answers today.

[Moderator's note: This student member meets Education.com's minimum age requirements for participation in JustAsk.]
In Topics: Science fair
> 60 days ago

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dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
Hi, What do you think is the answer to this question? That would be your hypothesis to test with an experiment.

Here is more on the scientific method and how to develop a science project:
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_What_Scientific/
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_How_Develop_Project/

Here are two similar science projects:

Use Water to Produce Energy
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Use_Water_Produce/

Water Electrolysis
http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Water_Electrolysis/

Please also refer to any materials or information your teacher provided, and ask your parent for help with your project as needed as well. Good luck!
> 60 days ago

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karanu
karanu writes:
Yes definitely.

Make Electricity from Saltwater and Oxygen
Introduction:

Chemical energy stored in different substances can be converted to electrical energy. This ability is the foundation of design of all batteries.  

Each battery has two poles usually made of two different metals. One pole is the positive pole and the other is the negative pole. Electrons can travel from negative pole to the positive pole via a conductor such as a wire.
 
 A flow of electrons in a conductor is called electricity and if large enough, it can be used to make electro magnet, light up a light bulb or run an electric motor. Inside each battery there are chemicals that cause such chemical reactions. These chemicals in general are called electrolytes.
 
 Project description:
In this project you will make a salt water battery and then perform a series of experiments to determine how does the amount of oxygen affect the life and the power of the battery.
 Details of this project:
More details or support on this project is available for the members of ScienceProject.com. Material needed for experiment or a science kit about this title may be available at MiniScience.com and klk.com online stores.
> 60 days ago

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Flovesanimals101
Flovesanima... writes:
Yes and I am also do Salt Water Energy for my Science Fair Project.
> 60 days ago

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isabella_saucedo
isabella_sa... , Student writes:
no,because salt and water really dosen't make anything,but salt water.
> 60 days ago

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mbaleosis
mbaleosis writes:
salt is made of chlorine and sodium ions.when you put salt in water, the water molecules pull the sodium and chlorine ions apart and  so they float freely.these ions carry electricity through water
> 60 days ago

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bineyser
bineyser , Student writes:
maybe. but it can turn on litghs.
> 60 days ago

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abdul.khair.moustafa.
abdul.khair... writes:
Yes it does work. I tried this experiment myself and it did work. So good luck with your experiment.
> 60 days ago

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CHARCLE
CHARCLE writes:
YES it rely work
> 60 days ago

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Livescore99
Livescore99 writes:
hi.....I am experts on architecting, implementing in addition to supporting answers that guide our shoppers take phase 2 in the business approach.
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> 60 days ago

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HawaiianLove19
HawaiianLov... writes:
depends on what you use with the saltwater as in copper or iron or any type of metal
> 60 days ago

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durgarani
durgarani writes:
yes.salt water make electricity
> 60 days ago

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Jobuk
Jobuk writes:
Does salt water make electricity?
25 days ago

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Lisa18967
Lisa18967 writes:
"Salt & Water, Power & People: A Short History of Hooker Electrochemical Co.," by Robert E. Thomas, Hooker Chemical Co., Niagara Falls, NY, 1955. This 109-page hardback tells the story of Hooker Chemical Co., best known for burying drums of waste chemicals in Love Canal in Niagara Falls, which became a major environmental site in the 1970s. Hooker Chemical was founded in 1903, as The Development and Funding Company by Elon Hooker, of Rochester, NY. He was from an old line New England family and had degrees in civil engineering from the University of Rochester and Cornell. A search for a suitable business for investment identified the Townsend cell, which converted salt to sodium hydroxide/caustic soda/lye, chlorine, and hydrogen by electrolysis. The chlorine was sold for "sanitation" (and chlorination of drinking water) and bleaching as chlorinated lime. (This was before the development of steel cylinders allowing shipment of liquid chlorine.)

Electrolysis of salt had been known since 1807, but the Townsend cell was the first practical cell. It used an asbestos diaphragm to keep the products from recombining in the cell. Hooker called in experts to assist in testing and improving the cell. Elmer Sperry, founder of Sperry Electric, and Leo Baekland, inventor of Bakelite (and Velox photographic paper) consulted for the company. After a cell was successfully tested at a rented site in Brooklyn, NY, Niagara Falls was selected as a plant site, taking advantage of low cost electricity from the Niagara Falls power project (completed in 1895), nearby salt mines (within 60 miles), and abundant water from the Niagara River. Syracuse, NY is the historic salt mining site in North America (known to the Indians and French Jesuits from 1654), but salt mines were also in Wyoming Co., NY near Mt. Morris, and salt deposits are known to extend from Albany, NY, through Detroit and Saginaw, MI, and on to Iowa and Wisconsin.

In the early days, lime was chlorinated by passing chlorine gas over slaked lime in room sized chambers. Workers in crude gas masks worked the lime to complete the conversion. Chlorinated lime had limited storage life. Hence, availability of caustic soda was limited by sales of chlorine derivatives. One of the early ones was chlorobenzene, which was converted to phenol and picric acid for use as an alternative to coal tar derived TNT in World War I. Later solvents like trichloroethylene were sold for metal degreasing and dry cleaning by subsidiary Detrex followed. (Hooker is the third American chemical company to make phenol during World War I.. Others included Dow and Monsanto.) Development of diaphragm cells also continued. Hooker technology was licensed to others. In 1918, Hooker formed a company to used its hydrogen co-product to hydrogenate vegetable oils. Additional chlorine derivatives included sulfur chloride and sodium chlorate.

In 1922, Hooker bought S. Wander & Sons and undertook retail sales of lye and chlorinated lime. The venture was sold in 1927. A West Coast chlor-alkali plant was built in Tacoma, WA in 1929. Later products included sodium sulfide, sodium sulfhydrate, sodium tetrasulfide, and aluminum chloride. In World War II, Hooker was a leading supplier of dodecyl mercaptan for the synthetic rubber program. Other wartime products included arsenic trichloride, thionyl chloride, and hexachlorobenzene. In the era of plastics, Hooker developed Hetron epoxy vinyl ester resins, and in 1955 acquired the Durez phenolic resins business.

The book ends in 1955, as Hooker is about to acquire Niagara Alkali Co. Later Hooker was acquired by Occidental Petroleum where it continues as part of Occidental Chemicals. Vinyl chloride monomer and PVC/vinyl plastic are now major chlorine derivatives. Occidental lists them as products, but they are not mentioned in the Hooker book.
25 days ago

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