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LAmbrose
LAmbrose asks:
Q:

Can I send my child to a school if we don't live in that district?

In Topics: Choosing a school
> 60 days ago

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dgraab
dgraab , Parent writes:
I would call the district for the school you would like your child to attend. Ask about their transfer policy, to find out if there's a way to transfer from your child's current school into the preferred school.

You can find district and school contact information using SchoolFinder (link below). Good luck!
> 60 days ago

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kidtherapist
kidtherapist , Child Professional writes:
Yes you can.  That is what we call a school of choice.  Where we all live the address is zoned for a particular school.  It does not mean that you have to attend that school.  However, if you pick another school, the school board does and will not provide you transportation for your child to and from the school.  I have done this and go to your county school board website and find all of the magnet schools or charter schools.  If you already have a school in mind then know that you have to provide transport to it and have to seek admission to that other school.  Magnet and charter schools usually have a waiting list.  I hope this helps.  Kara T. Tamanini
> 60 days ago

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RayNarayan
RayNarayan writes:
Hi,
How old is your child? If he is still in the kindergarten school then try to send him to a nearby school.
> 60 days ago

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systmkor
systmkor writes:
I actually have a question to add. What's the exact process to transfer from your responding school to another one. For my case. My husband have joint custody to his hid and goes to far school but I always pick up hideous from this school and my son goes to a peek near by. Since our drive route is adjusted to that I really want to put my son in the same school. Also cause we have a new member in the family who is going to attend the same daycare which will only be two blocks away. So I've been searching, but I need guidance
> 60 days ago

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ALindamood
ALindamood writes:
I also have something to add.  Our school system is paying to send our son to private school for his special education needs.  We would like to transfer our daughter to another school system.  Will this affect him?
> 60 days ago

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MishMashI
MishMashI writes:
I think that everyone has a right to choose an educational establishment for his child as only parent and, of course, a student knows what is best for him or her.  I cannot share my own experience but I feel so sorry for all parents of such kids who have to struggle for their children instead of supporting them and helping to find the right way. I taught one boy with the same problem and by the year he was really better. I was a small step to the victory but I realized how strong his mom is. She studied everything with her son, using various resources (  like http://myessayservicewriting.com/   ) for writing and then together they created amazing things. It was like a miracle but they did it.
> 60 days ago

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Lisa18967
Lisa18967 writes:
Kids everywhere discovering the wonder and joy found in simple needle and thread. And while sewing offers lots of benefits for children — it nurtures creativity, cognitive ability, coordination, and confidence and is a skill they’ll use their whole lives — kids know that it’s just plain fun.

Authors Amie Petronis Plumley and Andria Lisle teach a sewing camp in Tennessee that has earned praise from delighted children and parents. When families clamored for more, Plumley and Lisle launched a blog, sewingschool.blogspot.com, to rave reviews. Now, they’ve channeled the best of their children’s sewing projects into this lively, how-to sew book for ages five and up.

Featuring 21 inspired projects for young sewers, Sewing School allows kids to create fabric masterpieces with minimal supervision. All projects have been kid-tested, most can be made using simple hand stitches, and all can be embellished with personal touches. To further inspire young crafters, the book is full of photos and quotes from real boys and girls who have participated in the authors’ sewing camp.

 

Projects include items that children can hug (pillows, doll, blanket), hold (wallet, tote, drawstring pouch), give as gifts (coasters, glasses case, pot holder), and wear (sleep mask, hat, cuffs). Each project features step-by-step instructions written at a second-grade reading level, a close-up photo of every step, and a photo of the finished project. The book includes full-sized cutout patterns and instructions for how grown-ups can help.
> 60 days ago

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