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sharathkale
sharathkale asks:
Q:

My sister's son is not trying to speak, who is 2 years and 7 months old..Details are written below..Please give me suggestions..

Hello,
I am sharath..My sister's son is 2 years and 7 months old..He stays in Bangalore(Karnataka)..He does not try to speak even if we try to make him speak..He is going to play school from past 5 months..He speaks certain kannada words( only 3 or 4 words).. If we teach him certain words, he just looks at our face but does not try to pronounce it..He rarely points out the body parts like eyes, nose and mouth, that too if we repeatedly ask  him...
In Topics: Preparing my child for preschool, Speech and language issues
> 60 days ago

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Expert

ChildSpeechLanguage
Apr 16, 2012
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What the Expert Says:

Hello,

Does the child speak more than one language?  If so, it is not unusual for a child to experience a slight speech delay at that age.  

Nevertheless, it may be a good idea to have the child seen by a speech therapist, especially since you indicate he rarely uses gestures to identify body parts when you ask him.

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Additional Answers (2)

MrsBickford
MrsBickford writes:
I'm not sure if you have any youth development programs were you are, but if you do i would suggest contacting them about these issues. its good that he is observing you speaking to him. and you should continue trying to encourage him to speak. my son was talking very little when he was about 2 in a half then suddenly he just started saying full sentences. he is going to be evaluated for aspergers syndrome. i think that what you said about your nephew just staring and not interested in pointing to body parts or trying to pronounce words, sounds like he might have more going on in his mind than you know about, there are all kinds of therapy (without meds) that can be done for children with aspergers and autism spectrum disorders, especially if found in the first few years. i hope you can find a great program there that will evaluate him and help him in his specific way. my son has been in preschool since he turned 3 and they have an IEP (individual evaluation plan), goals they set for him and personally help him work towards and i am able to check on his progress at anytime. i hope this helps. and i pray you will find some good resources to help you help him better also.
> 60 days ago

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Zsazsa
Zsazsa writes:
It must be very concerning to both you and your sister. I live in Canada and even have a friend who speaks kannada as she was born in India!

As an educator of young children, it appears that he could be showing some of the signs and indicators of autism. However, I am NOT definitively saying that he has autism! It is important that he is properly assessed by a pediatric specialist to learn what is causing his delays.

From experience with some autistic south asian children (India and Pakistan) in previous classes I have taught over the years, I know that any diagnosis of a developmental delay is very difficult for the parents, especially if the child is a male.

I'm not trying to be racist but previous parents fought any diagnosis when it was made here in Canada. In two of the situations, the parents even returned to India because as we were told by them, they were going back home to have their child cured. In both cases, the child returned and the 'cure' was not to be found.

Any type of delay in a child will always require extensive work and therapy by professionals in the correct field. There is no cure for most delays but there is indeed an ability for improvement and progress if the proper resources are drawn upon.

Encourage your sister and husband to seek out a pediatriacian who is able to direct them to the proper resources.  It is important that therapy begins as soon as possible so that this wee boy can get the most benefit.

It may be as simple as using the services of a speech-language pathologist!  Above all, be a support to them as they seek help.  Every parent wants the best for their child and has a difficult time accepting that their child may be 'different'.
> 60 days ago

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