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BILLYRENE
BILLYRENE asks:
Q:

MY SON IS 8 HE HAS TROUBLE READING AND BLENDING WORDS BUT NO TROUBLE IN MATH.

MY SON IS 8 HE HAS TROUBLE READING AND BLENDING WORDS BUT NO TROUBLE IN MATH. WE LIVE IN A SMALL TOWN IN GA WITH A LOT OF TEACHERS THAT REALLY COULD CARELESS IF THE CHILDREN LEARN. LAST YEAR I PUT MY SON IN A PRIVATE SCHOOL IT SEEMED TO HELP HIM SOME BUT NOT ALOT. THE TEACHERS ARE TRYING TO GET HIM TESTED TO FIND OUT IF HE HAS A LEARNING PROBLEM. I DID NOT KNOW THE PUBLIC SCHOOL SYSTEM COULD DO THIS TESTING THEY DID NOT MAKE ME AWARE OF THIS WHEN HE WAS HAVING PROBLEMS IN PUBLIC SCHOOL THERE ANSWER WAS TO KEEP HIM BACK A YEAR THAT WAS OUT OF THE QUESTION WITH ME. WHAT CAN I DO TO GET HIM THE PROPER HELP?
In Topics: Learning issues and special needs, Learning disabilities
> 60 days ago

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hlevitan
hlevitan , Teacher writes:
Billyrene,

Thank you for your post.  I am sorry to hear that the public schools did not inform you of your right to testing.  It is great to hear that the private school is testing him now.

Understanding your legal rights can better assist you in obtaining the help your son needs in the public schools.  The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) affords you the right to request testing, and the public school should start the testing within 60 days of that request.  Parents can also file a complaint for a due process hearing with the State if they believe their child’s school has failed to provide their child with a free appropriate public education under the law. (Section 1415(f)).   Once a due process claim has been filed, the child must remain in their current educational placement, unless the parents and school agree to an alternate placement (Section 1415 (j)).  We at Education.com are not equipped to provide legal advice.  To obtain a referral for a special education attorney in your area look up the Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates (COPAA) on the internet at www.copaa.org

Here is a section of articles about “Special Education Testing” to better familiarize yourself with the referral and assessment process: http://www.education.com/topic/special-education-testing/

Here is a section of articles about “Special Education Laws and Legislation:”
http://www.education.com/topic/special-education-laws/

This article, “Learning Disability Reading Resources” provides resources and techniques to help children with reading comprehension and language articulation:
http://www.education.com/magazine/article/Learning_Disability_Reading/

These resources will hopefully be helpful to you.  Best wishes in getting your son the proper help he needs.  


Best,
     Hayley
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
Maybe your child has dyslexia?  
Dyslexia is a specific learning disability and primarily affects one’s ability to learn to read.  Dyslexia is characterized by difficulties with accurate and fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities.  Dyslexia varies in degrees of severity and is highly hereditary.  It is not uncommon for a child with dyslexia to have an immediate family member who also has this condition.  Also, it is not unusual for two or more children in a family to have dyslexia.
Dyslexia is estimated to affect some 20-30 percent of our population.  This means that more than 2 million school-age children in the United States are dyslexic.  Although children with dyslexia typically have average to above average intelligence, their dyslexia creates problems not only with reading, writing and spelling but also with speaking, thinking and listening.  Many times these academic problems can lead to emotional and self-esteem issues throughout their lives. Low self-esteem can lead to poor grades and under achievement.  Dyslexic students are often considered lazy, rebellious or unmotivated.  These misconceptions cause rejection, isolation, feelings of inferiority, and discouragement.
The central difficulty for dyslexic students is poor phonemic awareness.  Phonemic awareness is the ability to appreciate that spoken language is made up of sound segments (phonemes).  In other words, a dyslexic student’s brain has trouble breaking a word down into its individual sounds and manipulating these sounds.  For example, in a word with three sounds, a dyslexic might only perceive one or two.
Most researchers and teachers agree that developing phonemic awareness is the first step in learning to read.  It cannot be skipped.  When children begin to learn to read, they first must come to recognize that the word on the page has the same sound structure as the spoken word it represents.  However, because dyslexics have difficulty recognizing the internal sound structure of the spoken word to begin with, it is very difficult for them to convert the letters of the alphabet into a phonetic code (decoding).
Although dyslexia can impair spelling and decoding abilities, it also seems to be associated with many strengths and talents.  People with dyslexia often have significant strengths in areas controlled by the right side of the brain.  These include artistic, athletic and mechanical gifts.  Individuals with dyslexia tend to be very bright and creative thinkers.  They have a knack for thinking, “outside-the-box.”  Many dyslexics have strong 3-D visualization ability, musical talent, creative problem solving skills and intuitive people skills.  Many are gifted in math, science, fine arts, journalism, and other creative fields.
Dyslexia is a persistent learning difference that one does not outgrow. With early detection, proper intervention, and certain accommodations, dyslexics can improve their reading and spelling skills significantly and succeed academically.
Symptoms
Preschoolers
• Late talking, compared to other children
• Pronunciation problems, reversal of sounds in words (such as ‘aminal’ for ‘animal’ or ‘gabrage’ for ‘garbage’)
• Slow vocabulary growth, often unable to find the right word (takes a while to get the words out)
• Difficulty rhyming words
• Trouble learning numbers, the alphabet, days of the week
• Poor ability to follow directions or routines
• Does not understand what you say until you repeat it a few times
• Enjoys being read to but shows no interest in words or letters
• Has weak fine motor skills (in activities such as drawing, tying laces, cutting, and threading)
• Unstable pencil grip
• Slow to learn new skills, relies heavily on memorization
School Age Children
• Has good memory skills
• Has not shown a dominant handedness
• Seems extremely intelligent but weak in reading
• Reads a word on one page but doesn’t recognize it on the next page or the next day
• Confuses look alike letters like b and d, b and p, n and u, or m and w.
• Substitutes a word while reading that means the same thing but doesn’t look at all similar, like “trip” for “journey” or “mom” for “mother.”
• When reading leaves out or adds small words like “an, a, from, the, to, were, are and of.”
• Reading comprehension is poor because the child spends so much energy trying to figure out words.
• Might have problems tracking the words on the lines, or following them across the pages.
• Avoids reading as much as possible
• Writes illegibly
• Writes everything as one continuous sentence
• Does not understand the difference between a sentence and a fragment of a sentence
• Misspells many words
• Uses odd spacing between words.  Might ignore margins completely and pack sentences together on the page instead of spreading them out
• Does not notice spelling errors
• Is easily distracted or has a short attention span
• Is disorganized
• Has difficulties making sense of instructions
• Fails to finish work on time
• Appears lazy, unmotivated, or frustrated
Teenagers
• Avoids reading and writing
• Guesses at words and skips small words
• Has difficulties with reading comprehension
• Does not do homework
• Might say that they are “dumb” or “couldn’t care less”
• Is humiliated
• Might hide the dyslexia by being defiant or using self-abusive behavior
Adults
• Avoids reading and writing
• Types letters in the wrong order
• Has difficulties filling out forms
• Mixes up numbers and dates
• Has low self-esteem
• Might be a high school dropout
• Holds a job below their potential and changes jobs frequently

Treatment
The sooner a child with dyslexia is given proper instruction, particularly in the very early grades, the more likely it is that they will have fewer or milder difficulties later in life.
Older students or adults with dyslexia will need intensive tutoring in reading, writing and spelling using an Orton-Gillingham program.  During this training, students will overcome many reading difficulties and learn strategies that will last a lifetime. Treatment will only “stick” if it is incorporated slowly and consistently over time.  There is no such thing as a “quick fix.”
The best learning environment for a student with dyslexia is always one-to-one.  Students who have severe dyslexia may need periodic one-to-one tutoring to catch up and stay up with the rest of their class.  This specialized tutoring helps dyslexic students become successful in reading, writing, spelling, grammar, and vocabulary.  It also will help them with math, and word problems.
> 60 days ago

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TFCO
TFCO , Teacher, Parent writes:
Many children encounter reading difficulties at younger age. This could due to their lack of interest in reading or simply because they were never taught phonics at an early age. Once a child discovers that reading could be fun and easy, he would be motivated to learn. You can try reading materials from EducationalFun.com. These materials will help your child learn reading in a fun way.
> 60 days ago

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