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corsair1564
corsair1564 asks:
Q:

My son with ADHD/ODD is failing 6th grade because he won't get the homework done. Is tutoring the right answer & is there financial aid for this?

My 12 year old son does reasonably well on tests, but is failing the 6th grade because he won't do the homework and get it turned in. He's been diagnosed and is under treatment for ADHD and ODD, and we have started the process to create a 504 plan for him. Would tutoring help and if so, is there any financial aid to help pay for these services?
In Topics: Working with my child's teacher(s), Working with tutors, Special needs
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Allyn Anderson
Apr 25, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

I agree that it is so frustrating when a capable child fails. Your idea of a tutor is a great one. Unfortunately, most tutors do cost money unless your school or county provides free or low cost services to their constituents. Give your school a call; usually the counseling dept. handles this kind of a question.

You might seek other opportunities too. Consider having a capable student in 8th grade or above work with your child --- under your supervision, of course. Usually a person can get another student at a fraction of the cost for an adult or another type of tutoring program.

If you can, take time to sit down and study with your child; two working together is usually more fun than just one. Another option is to have your child sit at the kitchen table and work on homework while you cook supper. Sometimes a child just needs a "buddy" around. That way you can keep an eye on your child's progress and be available to help answer questions "immediately" when questions arise. Consider too shorter but more frequent work sessions. For instance, when studying vocabulary, ask your child to study only the ones he doesn't know, and then review those for 5-10 min. for about 3-4 times a day. I suspect your chld will find that he learns these better by studying shorter periods. I also find it helpful to have the child work with a timer, especially on math homework. I always ask the child how many problems he think he can do in 5 minutes. Let your child set the timer and work against his set time. If he makes his goal, give him a pat on the back. If he doesn't make it, just encourage him to try again.

Good luck in coordinating the help your son needs. Ms. A

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Additional Answers (8)

Aish
Aish writes:
If he is doing well on tests, that means that he understands the concepts and does not have a problem in retaining and delivering what he learns. Since he has trouble with finishing homework, he just needs someone to guide and help him with the homework.
I think a caring and friendly tutor can certainly help. But you should make sure that he gets 1-on-1 help as opposed to a group tutoring.

We have worked with quite a few children who were diagnosed with ADHD at www.clickandclimb.com and our tutors seem to have done well. The parents were very satisfied with the results. I think it's due to the 1-on-1 attention that the tutors can give to the students in a safe, secure and FUN online environment.

Take a look at my website- www.clickandclimb.com and compare the rates. You will be pleasantly surprised at how affordable it is. I would recommend you try 2 free sessions to see if the program is good for your family.

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kjack
kjack writes:
Its a quick question, but if he is failing because of homework only, he is learning. A tutor wont help. I was one of those kids many years ago. (70-80) I just plain tried to do as little as possible to get by. I dont know what ur child may be doing but by 5th grade I was trying to figure how many homework assignments I could miss without falling below a "D" grade. My school grades were very low, but, my test scores etc. were very high. Your child may or may not be the same way. You need to be involved with his teacher. It may very simply be a case of being bored to death.
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
You might consider working together with the teacher in his classroom to put together some type of positive reward system everytime he turns his homework in. For example the teacher could give him a ticket when he brings his homework in.  This ticket at home can get him an extra 15 minutes of video game time (or whatever you chose as the reward).  You might also guide him through the process of finishing his homework and then putting it in his backpack.  On the binder could be  a stickie note saying "did I give my homework to my teacher?"  Its important that he feel success the first few weeks of this new reward system.  Hopefully it will put him into a routine that will continue throughout the year.  If you do hire a tutor, make sure it is a specialized teacher that is trained to work with students with ADHD. You might have to pay for this privately but hopefully it won't be forever.  Sometimes just a month of study skills coaching and organizational training will do the job.
> 60 days ago

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virg.
virg. writes:
The fact is, because your son has ADHD/ODD, his mind wonders and he won.t or can't do his homework because of distractions of T. V. among other things.
> 60 days ago

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popprincess
popprincess writes:
Maybe one reason he might be failing tests is because of home life.  Are you always at work, or just doing something else?  Does he have brothers and sisters?  Does he usually go to his bedroom all the time?
> 60 days ago

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smulcaire
smulcaire writes:
Is he disorganized? Losing papers? Forgetting stuff in the morning? Doesn't know how to self advocate?  Doesn't follow directions?  He is not doing it intentionally. He just doesn't know how to organize, and the longer it goes on, the more frustrated he will be about it.  I wrote a workbook for students called The Middle School Student's Guide to Ruling the World!  which deals strictly with work habits, time management and organizational skills -- no social issues or bad hair day stuff. Don't spend money on tutoring if he has no problem with content. I also tell parents all the time, don't hire someone to be his "assistant".  He can learn basic organizational  skills. He just needs to be taught. Go to www.middleschoolguide.com - there are plenty of tips, and articles that will help.
> 60 days ago

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MommaFern
MommaFern writes:
I feel your pain.  I have seven children in total, several with some of the same challenges as you.  We have tried tutoring and special programs.  Some have helped more than others have but none have fixed this issue for us.  We have learned that for our children the best way is to find things our children enjoy and put that in study time.  We have done math facts in shaving cream on the kitchen table, practiced spelling words with Karate moves (he would hit my hand with each letter) and many other ways but those are my children’s favorites.  As far as home work being turned in that was harder.  We finally talked to each teacher and since they already had an IEP it was easy.  We made a chart everyday before they left the class the teacher would go to my child and initial a paper for that day it had the days HW written on it.  They would also make sure the worksheet or whatever was also in the folder.  When my children got home all HW was in one folder and in one place.  Then came the hard part!!  I had to work with them to complete this.  I had to sometimes ask teachers to supply an example of the new Techniques.  This took time.  I then would sign the paper, saying the work was completed, and write any note to the teacher that I needed and put back in the folder with a clean sheet for the next day.  Now my school has Ed-line, which makes it easier.  Their teachers and I can communicate easier.  Some teachers I email several times a week.  But doing these things I have had two children successfully finish HS.  Both of which was adopted and I did not have till ages nine and thirteen.  I only mention that as to let you know both were failing school when they came to me.  One struggled until the end but graduated with B's and C's but the other was able to finally grasp on and graduated honor roll.  Both I was tremendously proud of they accomplished a lot in the few years I was blessed to have them and did the best they could.  Now I just have five more special spirits to keep my night busy with homework and such.  Enjoy your child and their individuality find what they like and keep looking it changes always.  Then use your knowledge to build theirs.  Be creative!  Good luck!
> 60 days ago

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susyd11
susyd11 writes:
My son is 12 and has a similar problem.  It's his first year with a 504 plan and his issue is homework.  Last year it was modified, particularly if it is math and repetitious, only do the odd number problems.  If your son is getting good grades on tests which should out rank homework by far then he's learning.  Isn't that the ultimate goal?  Focus on learning, don't discourage him, remove obstacles, ask to have modifications, reduced amount, no points removed if late.  Although my son's 504 plan gives him more time, I don't agree.  He needs help focusing and following through not more time to daydream then forget.  It's just remarkable how many teachers don't understand this.  I use college as a reference for 6th grade.  Most college professors teaching a large class don't care if you do the homework with 200 students how can they however your midterm and final grades are everything.  If your son is learning and scores well on tests support him on that.  Modify the homework and have it minimized, focus on learning not failing.  As I tell my son's teachers lets focus on what he can do and not on what he can't.  A good tutor will help but you'll probably have to pay for it.  Best situation financially is to find a high school student to do it or teacher willing to help after school.
> 60 days ago

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