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dleathers
dleathers asks:
Q:

How do I know if my son has Asperger's Syndrome?

I have a five year old son who was diagnosed recently with ADHD.  I was not surprised about the diagnoses because my eldest son has ADHD.  However, I know that there is something more going on with my youngest son.  About a year ago my son's doctor felt that he showed signs of Asburger Syndrome, but when Easter Seals sent me the paperwork to fill out there was maybe only one question that I could say yes to.  So I decided not send it in thinking that Autism was not the problem.  However, now that my son has been on the medication for ADHD I can see other challenges that was masked by the ADHD.  I decided to look up mental disorders and did more research on Asburgers.  Now that I can see past the ADHD, I have noticed that my son exhibits almost all of the behaviors of Asburger Syndrome.  I have yet to talk to my doctor again, but have discussed this with his teacher.  Of course, she did not want to say that is what my son has, but she could also see why I have come to this conclusion.  I don't know what to do.  I know I need to talk to my doctor, but I am afraid she won't be much help.  I feel so lost and afraid for my son and how I am going to get him to the right places to get him diagnosed.  Can anyone help me?  I just feel so helpless.  
In Topics: Autism & Aspergers Syndrome
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Wayne Yankus
Mar 20, 2008
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What the Expert Says:

First, I would talk to your doctor. She/he knows your son the best of all the professionals.  Second, I would ask for a referral to a developmental specialist from your doctor if you feel that that office is not fully able to help you.  In many communities a mental health center has the diagnostic capabilities to help.  Also Child Find and Easter Seals may have professionals available.  Check with your insurance company to see who and what diagnostics they cover and who they recommend.

there are many people including your school who are able to help, but start with your doctor without delay.

Wayne Yankus, MD, FAAP
expert panelist: Pediatrics

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Additional Answers (2)

mamahinojosa
mamahinojosa writes:
Hi, I am a mom of 4. And I know exactly how you feeling, and I definitely understand your frustration. And let me be the first, if no one has told you this before...YOU ARE NOT CRAZY!! You as the mom is the primary figure in your sons life, because the sun and moon both rises and falls on mom. So you know your child 24/7. Any changes that happen, you notice it first, no doubt. So if you are noticing anything, and you feel in your heart that you are onto something, do not give up on what you feel. Somebody gotta listen eventually.

I am going through the same thing with my son. My oldest daughter, is 12, and was diagnosed late (about age 4) with classic autism. I have had my eyes wide open for ANY signs of anything on the spectrum, making sure not to jump too quickly towards anything. Well, my 9 1/2 year old son, got diagnosed with ADHD/ODD and mood disorder, by the time he was 22 months, because he was being oppositional at daycare, and was already being prescribed medicine. It only made him more aggressive, but it always seemed more like an anxiety thing, and not a physical aggression towards me. He was awfully aggressive at school, since he first started. Against his doctors orders, I went and had him tested for autism, because he was shrieking, spinning, tippy toe walking and some just tantruming out of control. He did not pass as autistic, but I was told that he may carry "autistic traits". After that, he still showed signs of aggression, and all teachers, and doctors deny that he is even anywhere on the spectrum. They say that he is TOO aggressive.

He had been on at least 4 different meds before the age of 5, including Ritalin and Adderall. I don't talk bad of these medicines at all. If they work for your child, great, but that was not the case with my son, I think he has either grown a tolerance for them, or he is just sensitive to them.

Anyway, in 2008 we moved to Texas to be closer to my father in law who was dying. And about a year and a half later we moved back to Wisconsin. During the time we were in Texas, my son did not even qualify to receive the services in the schools that said he was a loose cannon. My son was not on meds for over a year and did well at school. Although there was still issues with him making sound effects and tipping his chair in class, or he would just get up and leave the classroom, thinking that is was okay to do, because he just did not want to be there again. Now mind you, I have always had it in the back of my mind that my son is either misdiagnosed or underdiagnosed. But it seems to be the case of " the wheel that makes the loudest squeak, gets the most attention". This by all means is NOT acceptable for me.

So, now that we are back in Wisconsin, he has grown aggressive again to the school staff, not at home. Delinquency charges was even pressed against my son by his school principal, over an incident where he struggled to snatch his hand away from her, and in the process her arm was hit. My son is not intentionally mean to anyone. If teased, he takes it extremely seriously, and will lash out. I just can not possibly believe that this principal was teasing him, so I believe that the strike was a mistake. Oh well, anyway. that leads me up to date where he is now.

He is currently in a Day Treatment program because he just was not thriving in the environment of the EBD class. He has undergone a recent eval, and now they finally admit to seeing symptoms of PDD, and offered a new med. Once I got home, I discovered that it was yet another stimulant, and I felt like they are not listening to me at all. I am not a betting person, but I am willing to bet that my feelings of my son being on the spectrum combined with some ADHD and anxiety is right on the money, yet every other professional that is working with him now, is saying "no" and that they think he is mocking his sister. My daughter has classic autism, and for half it, she doesn't have much to do with him during the day other than meals, and family movies/games, etc. She likes her privacy, and he likes his.

I am currently going through through the process of building my own circle of unbiased support. It would be nice to hear what a doctor has to say that has not been already influenced by a professional that has already "put their foot down on the matter." Keep with what you believe. If you see something is not right with your son, get it checked out. The sooner you can get something going, the sooner he can the most out of his treatments. If you have a doctor that talks more on the medical miracles than the diagnosis itself, you may wanna run for the hills. After all that my son has been through with these meds, and all I have been through with his moods because of them, and the stress that the teachers, doctors, psychs, etc unknowingly inflict (well, at least I will give them the benefit of the doubt that they don't know the stress they inflict on the family ;) I wanna carefully learn and know what my son's full diagnosis is and then we can talk about what we can medicate.

You do what is best for your son. Mom knows most.... even more so, Mama knows BEST!!!

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Annie6
Annie6 writes:
Have you ever tried the Feingold diet to eliminate some of the behaviors.  It is wild how the additives in food are making our kids out of control.  Look into it - it is a better alternative than the meds.
> 60 days ago

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