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Anonymous asks:
Q:

my son wants to drop out of high school

my son is almost 16 and really hates high school...its a fight every single day with my cell phone ringin at work b4 6am at work most mornings. i am so dreading this year he hates goin and his I.Q is off the charts..hes just so borded with the traditional setting..he hates being there so much,he acts out and gets in trouble just so he will get kicked out and does not have to go,.can any one give me some suggestions? we live in the Pacific area,and we really can not afford private school,and they have closed our alternative high school due 2 budget cuts...i dont know what if any help is out there...my husband is about to give up and let him drop out,but i say NO WAY!
In Topics: School and Academics, Motivation and achievement at school
> 60 days ago

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Expert

LouiseSattler
Aug 22, 2011
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What the Expert Says:

Thank you for writing to JustAsk!

I am so sorry that your family has encountered a difficult crossroads. When a child is gifted it can be as challenging to find appropriate educational programs than when a child has serious delays.

I find that an outside resource is often the help a family may need. Such as a mentor who "gets" teenage boys that are bright.

In addition, many community colleges will accept high school students and help them complete academic HS requirements on their campus.  

Perhaps these links will help give you some resources to help you.

http://www.nagc.org/index.aspx?id=538
http://giftedkids.about.com/od/giftedadolescents/Gifted_Teens.htm

Best wishes for a better school year!




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Additional Answers (4)

LilDeadHead
LilDeadHead writes:
Your story sounds familiar. Maybe it's just wishful thinking but does your kid maybe go to westside high school? I have a friend that is saying he is gonna drop out on his birthday and I know how smart he is and what amazing things he could do! I say make him go! At most high schools kids can take AP or honors classes that will challenge him. MAKE HIM GO!
> 60 days ago

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traci.simmons
traci.simmons writes:
Have you thought about letting him get his G.E.D. and start attending college? There has to be some kind of grants to help with the money for your son to attend. It's something to think about.
> 60 days ago

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catstrax
catstrax writes:
I am facing the same problem in the middle of my son's 10th grade year. He wants to take his GED and go to college; however , the age requirement is 18 yrs old and 17 yrs with exception. I have been exploring the High School Proficiency Certificate in our state(CHSPE,California) where a student can be 16 years old to take it. This certificate is accepted at colleges. My son is bored and does not seem interested in the "high school" experience and has attended both a good public high school and a private school. You  might also consider independent study OR a homeschool charter program tailored to his interests. I feel its more important to meet the child where his learning is at and build upon what he wants to achieve versus continually battling the system which is often very broken and ineffective ESPECIALLY for a person who is not going to comply. The worst result can be further stress in the home which will deteriorate his relationship to the family. I encourage you to find a solution that you and he can agree  to so that he at least get his high school credentials. Maybe he would do well with an online homeschool program where he can learn at his own pace and interact with teachers. The ones I know of are Christian based but Im sure your state offers programs also. Good Luck and hang in there. !!
1 day ago

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Lisa18967
Lisa18967 writes:
Dropping Out: Why Students Drop Out of High School and What Can Be Done About It
-This is a brilliant book. It is brilliant because it is covers so many aspects of the very complicated issue of high school dropouts in enough detail to please an academic but presents that same research in very accessible, readable writing. If there is one "go-to book" on the subject, this is it. What I really appreciate about this book is that the author delivers on his promise to explain not only the nature of the dropout crisis but also includes research on why students drop out and examines the individual and social consequences of dropping out. I have read too many other books and articles about this topic that "overpromise." This book is a masterful examination of many aspects of the dropout issue.
the vast majority of kids in the developed world finish high school—but not in the United States. More than a million kids drop out every year, around 7,000 a day, and the numbers are rising. Dropping Out offers a comprehensive overview by one of the country’s leading experts, and provides answers to fundamental questions: Who drops out, and why? What happens to them when they do? How can we prevent at-risk kids from short-circuiting their futures?

Students start disengaging long before they get to high school, and the consequences are severe—not just for individuals but for the larger society and economy. Dropouts never catch up with high school graduates on any measure. They are less likely to find work at all, and more likely to live in poverty, commit crimes, and suffer health problems. Even life expectancy for dropouts is shorter by seven years than for those who earn a diploma.

Rumberger advocates targeting the most vulnerable students as far back as the early elementary grades. And he levels sharp criticism at the conventional definition of success as readiness for college. He argues that high schools must offer all students what they need to succeed in the workplace and independent adult life. A more flexible and practical definition of achievement—one in which a high school education does not simply qualify you for more school—can make school make sense to young people. And maybe keep them there.
I  have too much to read and not enough time to read everything that gets sent to me or seems interesting. There is no small amount of relief, if not joy, when a journal arrives or something is sent to me, and I realize after skimming it for 30 seconds that I can simply file or delete it. Sometimes, however, I have to read every sentence in a text not simply because it is well written but because the author has something to say. Sometimes, because my time is short, I find myself in the odd position of savoring every chapter of a book while at the same time cursing the author--why couldn't this book simply be half-baked so I could rush on to the next text? Consequently, for the last month or so, I've been muttering "Damn you, Russ Rumberger!"

Professor Rumberger of UC Santa Barbara has written a book on dropping out. The book is superb. It is erudite, scholarly, engaging, and provocative. The almost 400-page book is the work of a lifetime and is testimony to how a first-rate scholar builds his case for a vexing problem by calling on historical research, data sets from multiple methodologies, and research that spans over a generation.

If we want to increase college-going rates and improve college readiness we are going to have to deal with the continuing problem of high school dropouts. What we do, however, depends not simply on one or another strategy, but on the data we employ to understand those who drop out. Rumberger also makes a convincing case that we not only need to consider the causes of dropping out, but also the purposes of our schools. I can make a convincing case for "college for all." Rumberger can make a more convincing case that if "all" = 100% then we actually will contribute to dropping out.

Sometimes academics cook up arcane language and terms that only those of us in the rarefied atmosphere of the academy will understand (Pierre Bourdieu, anyone?). Early in his text Rumberger talks about dropping out as a status and an event. I actually find such a distinction very helpful in thinking through what's going on, and what we might do.

I could say the text is depressing because he offers no magic bullets. But the work is realistic more than anything else. He cautions us--as any good researcher must--that if there were a magic (and inexpensive) solution, then everyone would be doing it. Instead, he works his way patiently through the familial, organizational, and individual characteristics that influence dropping out. He then walks us through the nature, consequences, causes, and possible solutions. Because the text is so well written, and the logic of his argument so sound, the reader never gets lost.
I also appreciated the tone of the book. The author is always present, but this is by no means a confessional memoir of someone who has spent his academic career researching the topic. The text is also not a diatribe where students, families, teachers, or policy experts are villains or victims. He describes an environment the way I have seen it played over the years--one where people are trying to cope and they do what they think is the best that they can. Some cope better than others, but in the end, solutions seem to evade us.

Rumberger calls upon all methodologies and various strands of programs to consider what possible solutions might look like. He is someone who is big on accountability, and consistent in the observation that systemic change will take time. He recognizes that students may drop out of a school, but much of the work to lessen dropping out will occur with families and in communities.

The day I finished this book we went to the Los Angeles Philharmonic and saw Gustavo Dudamel conduct Stravinsky's Rite of Spring. On the way home I thought how rare--and pleasurable--it was to watch two maestros at work on the same day.

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