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Delya
Delya asks:
Q:

How can I help my son get out from Individual Education Plan and Modified program ?

My son is going to Grade 4 this year. He has been in modified program and Individual Education Plan for the passed 3 years. The teachers told me that I have to work hard during the summer to catch up the 4 grade level. I wish my son to be in normal program.
In Topics: Learning issues and special needs
> 60 days ago

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Expert

LouiseSattler
Aug 3, 2012
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What the Expert Says:

Hello and thank you for writing to JustAsk,

First, note that thousands of children have IEPs around the country.  The stigma of having a child who needs special help in school hopefully is fading. The key, in my opinion, is to provide for your son the best program to help him succeed based on his skill level.

If you feel that he has mastered all his skills and the difficulties he experienced have been overcome, then ask in writing for a team meeting to discuss your request.

Best wishes-

Louise Sattler, NCSP

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Additional Answers (3)

mgreer
mgreer writes:
Just because your son has an IEP doesn't mean that he isn't in a normal program unless he is in a self contained sped classroom.  I taught for 11 years and had kids with an IEP and they were in a normal program just given extra time on tests or a special place to take a test or priority sitting in the classroom.  Your son could bloom this year in 4th grade all of a sudden.  Some kids need extra boost of maturity or just growth before they bloom at a grade they are in.  Just continue helping him at home and working with the teachers and I am sure all will be great.  The fact that he is advancing is a great sign.  Have a great year.  You also have a right to meet with your pupil appraisal team about his IEP and express your concerns and as a parent can say...hey I want to change this on his IEP...don't let them tell you any different.  I have a child in high school in a self contained sped and last year I changed things I disagreed with even though they disagreed with me.  You know what is best for your child.
> 60 days ago

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KCOK
KCOK writes:
Without knowing what your son's disability is it is hard to answer that question if you are asking what you can do to help him transition out of special education. I can assure you if he is behind in reading and writing you would do him a great service if you spend at least 20 minutes a day reading to/with him. You have to be religious about this and when he has improved in reading (at whatever level he is on now) you can start by having him write short sentences about what he has read as he is reading his book. This is what I tell all my students parents when they want to know why their child doesn't get homework. I tell them to work on reading, reading, reading. If you can't do this maybe get him a tutor. My daughter had an IEP in school and she spent every summer going to tutors or working on organized computer programs to improve her skills. During the school year we paid tutors to help her with her math. She is now in college and working hard to be a student with good grades. Good luck
> 60 days ago

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ericaboyd-la
ericaboyd-la writes:
Your son can be in a regular education program provided that he has demonstrated growth in attaining his IEP goals.  As the parent, you are a member of the IEP team and can call for an IEP meeting.  You will have to give the school a little time to arrange for the meeting, but legally they must comply with your desire to hold a meeting (even if it is not time for the annual IEP meeting).  At the meeting, tell them you want to discuss moving your son from an IEP to a 504 plan.  A 504 is for regualr education students who need a few accomodations in order for fully access the general education curriculum.  Your son will receive academic support but not be considered a student receiving Special Education services.  If you have resistence from your son's school, perhaps you can get help from a parent advocacy group.
> 60 days ago

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