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FLASHDRIVE
FLASHDRIVE asks:
Q:

WHAT SHOULD MY SON REALLY BE LEARNING IN 1ST GRADE?

LIKE MATHS-CLOCKS,PROBLEM SOLVING, TABLES, DIVISION
 ENGLISH- NOUNS PRONOUNS VERBS, COMPREHENSIONS, COMPOSITIONS, SPELLING
HEALTH SCIENCE, GENERAL SCIENCE, SOCIAL STUDIES AND OTHER SUBJECTS HAVE ME KIND OF PUZZLED SINCE I CANNOT REMEMBER ANYTHING IN THEM. PLEASE HELP ME. THANK YOU
In Topics: School and Academics
> 60 days ago

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CBrimmer
CBrimmer writes:
I skipped first grade completely so I never went myself, however there should be state guidelines that show what each child should know at the end of each grade. You can likely find these on the school districts website, or ask the teacher/principal for a listing. If they cannot help you go to the Board of Education where all such records should be kept and available. Of course if you feel that your child is not being challenged, please do "lessons" at home too. Public schools especially have a hard time teaching children on their specific level due to the fact that they have to teach the class not the child. Some basics to make sure that your child can do is sight words from the Dolch word list, it is broken down by grade/age, make sure that he can tell digital time and give examples of the times 12pm is lunch 8pm is bedtime and so on to help with am/pm difference, adding and subtracting with small objects (I find decorative pebbles easiest) and a basic sense of community (i live on oak street, my school is on pine street, we live in Georgia, our country is the US etc. Encourage natural discovery and explain things, this will encourage him to keep asking and learning!
> 60 days ago

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Tpatel5
Tpatel5 writes:
It depends on what state you live. You can look up the state standards online and that will tell you what they are learning in school. Also talking to their teacher helps.
> 60 days ago

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AnitaMcGuire
AnitaMcGuire writes:
Your child should be able to read children's books at this point in the year.  Here is a general rule to keep in mind when your child is reading a book.  It is called the five finger rule.  If your child misses more than five words on a page then he should read a simpler story.  Your child should know all letter sounds and be able to sound out simple one syllable words.  He should be able to write simple sentences to form a paragraph at this point.  In math he should be able to add and subtract single and double digit numbers without regouping, be able to tell time to the hour and half hour, count change, measure using a ruler to the nearest inch or centimeter, count by 2's, 5's, and of course 10's, know simple fractions like one half, one third, and one fourth.
> 60 days ago

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