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sally ..k
sally ..k asks:
Q:

my son is not performing in school, but he is very bright.

my son is not performing in school as he should, he  comes in test all 22nd out of 25 children, he does not seem to be confident in his work, he will know an answer and just be afraid to say it, he is easily distracted in school when he is around his friends.  
when he is home doing revision the same work he gets wrong in school is the same work he gets correct home. when he cannot figure out his work he get very nervous and frustrated, could one of this reason be that he is an only child in the home not having any one to play with so he things school is to play, he spends most of his leisure time watching TV, or is this a sign of ADHD, please help me.
In Topics: Learning styles and differences
> 60 days ago

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Expert

KidAngel
May 13, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

You do not say how old he is and what grade he is in? How long has this been going on? I would say he needs to see his pediatrician for further testing. Alot of pediatrician offices are now doing testing for LD"s. Get this done and start ruling out what it may or may not be to get your resolution. Help is out there!
Barbara Antinoro
Educational Counsleor
Kid Angel Foundation
Education.com team

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Additional Answers (5)

Wayne Yankus
Wayne Yankus writes:
You know your child the best.  You did not mention his age,but I would start with your pediatrician.  Have a physical examination and discuss the issue with her/him. Perhaps there is a learning disability or there is ADD or dyslexia.  A good developmental screening will be important.  Your doctor's office will be a good start.

Wayne Yankus, MD, FAAP
expert panelist: pediatrics
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
A parent's intuition is usually the best indicator of a learning difference.  Don't wait to get help if you feel that you child might be struggling with a hidden disability. ADHD and LD are considered "hidden disabilities" because they are usually not visible or apparent to others.  These children usually have average to above average intelligence and are often quite bright.  Their brains just process information differently, which makes learning and using certain skills a struggle for them.   I suggest you go to an Educational Psychologist or Neuropsychologist who specializes in testing and assessing learning differences.  Check with your insurance to see if this is covered or not.  If not - it is worth the money to get your child assessed ASAP to rule out a possible disorder.  If your child truly has a LD then it is so important that you get him the help he needs.  Begin nervous and frustrated are the first signs of self-esteem issues.  You definitely don't want this.  Good luck to you!
> 60 days ago

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c4lobos
c4lobos writes:
I have the same concern for my five and a half old. He is extremely bright and confident in all things except reading. He hates alphabets and phonics. He just cannot read. Please help
> 60 days ago

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dev1999
dev1999 writes:
I have Dyslexia and ADHD. I'm a sophomore in high school.
I remember 6 and 7th grade. It sucked, I hated being Dyslexic and I felt that no matter how hard I tried I'd just fail in school, which I did, so I stopped trying. My grades went down from a B to a D, towards the end of 7 grade. I got into music and stared playing the drums. My grades went back up to a B. When Ii stared the drums, for some strange reason, school got easier than it had been. Going into 8th I stared playing the guitar and played blackball and  cheer and my grades went up again, to an A. I feel that just getting interested in some thing can help, it gets your mind off Dyslexia. This past year I had a report I had to do on someone or something that made a difference in my life, so I did on music and how that help me in school and  in life so I stared researching "Dyslexia Drummers"  and I found this story at the link i put below about Pat Gesualdo, you really need to check it out!
> 60 days ago

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threecubs
threecubs writes:
I noticed similar issues with my son in preschool (age 4 notably).  His teacher told me he "needed medication" was "probably ADD" and was "disruptive to other students when they were trying to work."  I sat in on classes at various times.  When I noticed he moved from the group circle inch by inch until he was practically under the teacher's chair while she read, or after listening to instructions, he would abandon his work to look over classmates shoulders and gab with them, and saw his agony and hurt when he was chastised about his poor accomplishments, thus, lack of interest and willingness to try, I called on our pediatrician, who sent me to a specialist to have his eyes checked.  Low and behold, he was practically blind as a bat!  I couldn't believe how he had been compensating during his short life.  Once he had glasses (and I suggest two pair in case one is broken or lost) everything fell into place.  However, what happened next was that it was also determined he is colorblind.  So, perhaps it is not that simple, but it's worth looking into.
> 60 days ago

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