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cinastasha
cinastasha , Child Professional, Teacher, Caregiver, Parent, Student asks:
Q:

My son has ADHD and is having problems. What should I do?

he is naughty, adhd, always wants his way. beats sister. behavoir probs. at school , and mistreats familey teachers all consulars. Should i put him in a house or suver?
In Topics: Parenting / Our Family, ADHD & attention issues, Discipline and behavior challenges
> 60 days ago

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Expert

Wayne Yankus
Dec 21, 2009
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What the Expert Says:

Dear Cinastasha:

About 33% of boys with ADHD will have an additional condition which is often oppositional defiant behavior.  I would suggest you speak with his school and his doctor to work out a plan to modify his behavior.  Check also with your community mental health services to see if they offer programs for children dealing with behavior and ADHD.

Wayne Yankus, MD, FAAP
expert panelist: pediatrics
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Additional Answers (4)

Relle
Relle , Student writes:
You should be peatient with him and focus on him more because sometimes all they want is attention, but the only way they no how to get it is by acting out.
> 60 days ago

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Gladdy
Gladdy writes:
My friends nephew is now 22 and still suffers with ADHD.  Apart from having plenty for him to do that will occupy his mind, keep talking to him so he understands what will be expected of him to become a useful member of the society with a job or on a training scheme
> 60 days ago

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LDSolutions
LDSolutions , Child Professional writes:
You will need to strengthen your child's production controls of attention.

To help develop previewing skills, parents can encourage their kids to come up with a plan before writing a report, starting a project, or drawing a picture.  Children need to preview consciously, to visualize and describe what the outcome or result is likely or desired to be.

It is often helpful to stress previewing in a child’s area of talent.  For example, a child who is good at carpentry might be asked to draw a rough sketch of what the final product will look like prior to starting the actual work.  Parents should spend time discussing this sketch and helping the child think through possible revisions in advance.

Kids can be helped with previewing as part of their summer reading.  Before reading a book, they should try to preview what its content is going to be based on the book’s title.

To work on the aspects of options control, parents can ask questions like: “What are the different ways we might do this? What do you think is probably the best way? What would be the worst way to go about this?”  This sort of reviewing of alternative strategies can occur before preparing a report or studying for a test. Such techniques can also help with overall problem-solving skills.

The same kind of help can be related to behavioral and social planning (e.g., “What’s the best thing to do about that girl who called you a bad name in school today?  What are some other things you could consider doing? What would work best? Which of these possibilities is a bad idea?”).

To help children with improper pacing, parents should discourage frenetic work patterns by avoiding statements such as: “You can watch television when you finish your work.” Offers of this kind may inadvertently encourage children to work as quickly and carelessly as possible.

It can help a child’s pacing to set aside a certain amount of time each evening (or each weekday evening) for cognitive work.  The whole family should be engaged in such activities.  There is then no incentive to finish quickly, since it will only mean having to find some other brainwork to do.

Kids who need specific help with self-monitoring and proofreading (quality control) can benefit from looking for discrepancies or errors in their work or in the work of others.  They should be required to proofread their own work but only after an interval of hours or days has passed since the work was completed.  It is very tedious for anyone to correct something immediately after completing it.

For more tips and suggestions on Strengthening Your Child's Production Controls of Attention:
> 60 days ago

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sweetjam
sweetjam writes:
first have him evaluated to see if he qualify for some services,and do a positive award system. I  have a son that is 11 yrs.old and he has adhd and these are the methods  i have used.He is on  medication for the adhd and it's making a difference  but meds isn't for everyone.That's a decision you would have to make.
> 60 days ago

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