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onewhocares
onewhocares asks:
Q:

need help on how to speak to the school board to appeal a recommendation that was made  to my son to be suspended, and attend a alternative school.

In Topics: School and Academics
> 60 days ago

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Expert

BMelton
Sep 11, 2013
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What the Expert Says:

You must feel the school district has been unfair in assessing your son's punishment You need to refer to your school policies on due process and speaking to the school board. Since the school board meetings are public, you may also want to ask about how to maintain your privacy in this manner. If your child committed an offense, the school district policies and state laws dictate placement. Usually placement is a grading period or a semester, depending on the offense.


I was a school counselor in an inner-city, alternative school setting for several years. I would suggest talking to someone on the alternative school campus to find out how the school works. Our approach was therapeutic and structured. After seeing improvements in their child's grades and behaviors, many parents wanted to keep their child at the smaller, alternative school.


Realize that taking responsibility for a wrong-doing is a first step in learning that consequences follow. [Much better to learn a lesson at an early age than to continue misbehaving and take more severe consequences later in life.]


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BMelton
BMelton , Teacher writes:
You must feel the school district has been unfair in assessing your son's punishment You need to refer to your school policies on due process and speaking to the school board. Since the school board meetings are public, you may also want to ask about how to maintain your privacy in this manner. If your child committed an offense, the school district policies and state laws dictate placement. Usually placement is a grading period or a semester, depending on the offense.


I was a school counselor in an inner-city, alternative school setting for several years. I would suggest talking to someone on the alternative school campus to find out how the school works. Our approach was therapeutic and structured. After seeing improvements in their child's grades and behaviors, many parents wanted to keep their child at the smaller, alternative school.


Realize that taking responsibility for a wrong-doing is a first step in learning that consequences follow. [Much better to learn a lesson at an early age than to continue misbehaving and take more severe consequences later in life.]

> 60 days ago

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